Turns out, Seattle leaders have some issues with e-mail, too.

After months of enduring bombshell releases of incriminating messages that seemed to doom their case, the SuperSonics have produced damning e-mail from Seattle power brokers in the trial that will determine whether the team will move to Oklahoma City or be forced to play the final two years of its lease at Seattle’s KeyArena.


 Turns out, Seattle leaders have some issues with e-mail, too.
After months of enduring bombshell releases of incriminating messages that seemed to doom their case, the SuperSonics have produced damning e-mail from Seattle power brokers in the trial that will determine whether the team will move to Oklahoma City or be forced to play the final two years of its lease at Seattle’s KeyArena.
U.S. District Judge Marsha Pechman will hear closing arguments Thursday to end this six-day trial.
The Sonics lawyers introduced evidence last week showing the former U.S. senator whom the city hired to lead its effort to keep the team was involved in a “poisoned well” plan to force Sonics owner Clay Bennett — the supposed villain in this civic drama — into losing so much money he would sell the team to local buyers.
But how much will that matter?
Pechman will be focused on the case’s fundamental issue: exactly what does the Sonics’ lease require? And what is the appropriate remedy for the final two seasons of it, which Bennett’s Professional Basketball Club LLC wants to buy out so it can move the Sonics to the owners’ hometown for the 2008-09 season?


Gatorade stains bring big money at auction
BOSTON (AP) — The Gatorade-stained shirt worn by Boston Celtics coach Doc Rivers as the team won its first NBA championship in 22 years has been auctioned for $55,000.
An anonymous bidder bought the shirt, autographed by Rivers and Celtics star Paul Pierce, and the accompanying Gatorade bucket at a charity auction on sports radio WEEI-AM’s Web site. The proceeds will benefit the Boston Celtics Shamrock Foundation.
The foundation said Tuesday the high bid of $35,000 came from an anonymous bidder. Gatorade and a second anonymous donor each pledged $10,000 to bring the total to $55,000.
Celtics managing partner and foundation president Steve Pagliuca offered a personal donation of $35,000 to the charity if the winning bidder would share the shirt at certain times for display. No word yet on whether the bidder will accept the offer.


Umpire hit by broken bat
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Plate umpire Brian O’Nora was hit in the head by a shattered piece of Miguel Olivo’s broken bat, forcing him out of Tuesday night’s game between the Colorado Rockies and Kansas City Royals.
O’Nora was injured in the bottom of the second inning when Olivo’s bat broke on a groundout to shortstop. The umpire walked over to the corner of Kansas City’s dugout, where he was treated by Royals trainer Nick Swartz and led down the tunnel.
The Royals later announced that O’Nora had a small cut on his forehead and was taken to St. Luke’s Hospital for further evaluation.
After O’Nora was hurt, both teams left the field and the game was delayed for 13 minutes before resuming with three umpires. Paul Nauert, who began the night as the first base umpire, moved behind the plate.


Rodman sentenced
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Former NBA star Dennis Rodman pleaded no contest to misdemeanor spousal battery Tuesday and was ordered to undergo counseling and to perform highway or other physical labor.
Two other counts were dismissed under a plea deal, the Los Angeles city attorney’s office said.
Rodman was sentenced to a year of domestic violence counseling, three years of probation and 45 days of graffiti removal or road cleanup work for the California Department of Transportation or a similar program in Florida where he lives, said city attorney’s spokesman Frank Mateljan.


Banned athlete continues appeals
PENSACOLA, Fla. (AP) — Banned sprinter Justin Gatlin got support but no relief Tuesday from a federal judge who rescinded his order allowing the defending 100-meter champion to compete in this weekend’s Olympic track and field trials.
Judge Lacey Collier said that while he believed Gatlin “is being wronged,” he lacked jurisdiction over the U.S. Olympic Committee to determine who is eligible for the trials.
The former world 100- and 200-meter champion’s next recourse will be with an appellate court in Atlanta. Gatlin’s attorney, Joe Zarzaur, told The Associated Press that he will file an appeal Wednesday morning along with a motion asking the 11th Circuit court to reinstate the injunction during the appeals process, which would allow Gatlin to run in the trials.