Car enthusiasts took a stroll back in time Saturday as restored cars, trucks and bikes cruised into Shawnee’s Woodland Veterans Park for the 23rd annual Knights Auto Club Car Show.


Spectators viewed more than 160 entries from every decade dating back to pre-1920s. Auto club members from across the state traveled to Shawnee to show off their restorations and passion.


Choctaw resident Randall Slack, member of Christian Rods and Customs Car Club of Oklahoma City, said there is something inside all car lovers that keeps them coming to various car shows, eyeing different models and buying a classic of their own.


“I just love them,” he said.


Slack, owner of a 1950 Pontiac Silver Streak, said car shows take people back to a different time and place — a time when people could leave their keys in their cars and gas was cheap.


Car enthusiasts took a stroll back in time Saturday as restored cars, trucks and bikes cruised into Shawnee’s Woodland Veterans Park for the 23rd annual Knights Auto Club Car Show.

Spectators viewed more than 160 entries from every decade dating back to pre-1920s. Auto club members from across the state traveled to Shawnee to show off their restorations and passion.

Choctaw resident Randall Slack, member of Christian Rods and Customs Car Club of Oklahoma City, said there is something inside all car lovers that keeps them coming to various car shows, eyeing different models and buying a classic of their own.

“I just love them,” he said.

Slack, owner of a 1950 Pontiac Silver Streak, said car shows take people back to a different time and place — a time when people could leave their keys in their cars and gas was cheap.

“Cars had elegance and class,” he said. “You could drive across the country for a leisurely drive.”

As his eyes started to spark with excitement, Slack said he bought his car five years ago, and it has a flathead six-cylinder engine with a three-speed transmission. He said the Silver Streak was built from 1935 to 1953.

Pontiacs were a step up from the Chevy models of the time, he said. Chevys were considered ‘plain Jane’ and used on the farm. Pontiacs had many amenities including windshield washers and floor heaters on the driver’s side.

The passion for classic cars runs deep in the Slack home. Slack said when he considered selling the car, his wife told him they would be homeless living in the car before they would consider selling it.

Norman resident Manuel Vigil brought his 1955 Chevy truck to the show, but he also came to check out what others were doing in the world of restoration.

“I learn a lot,” Vigil said. “It’s nice to see different work, and see ideas that you can remember for the next restoration you do.”

Vigil said for him, it’s the enjoyment of fixing old cars and being able to drive them. He said it’s a challenge to restore something from the past.

He said he has had the truck for 34 years, but the restoration took place within the past year. He repainted, replaced the upholstery and replaced the engine.

Vigil said he has two more restorations in the works — a 1937 Chevy Coup and a 1969  Plymouth Roadrunner.

The car show provided awards for grand prize winners and best of show winners. Grand prize winners received $500 and $250, respectiviely. A $300 gift certificate was given by 4-Way Transmission. Best of Show winners received plaques.

The Knights Auto Club has monthly cruise-ins at  Kountry Fried Chicken and Catfish on Harrison Street in Shawnee on the fourth Tuesday each month.