For close to three decades now, animal lovers in the Tecumseh area have had a steady source of TLC for their ailing companions.

Dr. Bob Evans and his wife opened Tecumseh Veterinary Clinic in September 1978. The clinic’s only real specialty, per se, is taking care of animals.

“We’ve always kind of been a mixed practice,” said Evans, a Perkins native. “Anything that comes in, except some exotics, we try to take care of.”


For close to three decades now, animal lovers in the Tecumseh area have had a steady source of TLC for their ailing companions.
Dr. Bob Evans and his wife opened Tecumseh Veterinary Clinic in September 1978. The clinic’s only real specialty, per se, is taking care of animals.
“We’ve always kind of been a mixed practice,” said Evans, a Perkins native. “Anything that comes in, except some exotics, we try to take care of.”
Everything from puppies and kittens to cows and horses can receive some medical attention from the doctors at Tecumseh Veterinary Clinic, which is located on SH 9 in the eastern part of the city. The facility once housed a Wonder Bread warehouse, Evans said.
Dr. Gary Lenaburg, a graduate of Lookeba/Sickles High School, joined the practice in 1979. Bethel native and Bethel High School graduate Dr. Colby Carpenter joined in 2006.
All of the doctors at Tecumseh Veterinary Clinic are graduates of the Oklahoma State University College of Veterinary Medicine.
“We really feel like we’re compassionate and care about our clients and their animals,” Lenaburg said. “We try to be available 24/7.”
Evans and Lenaburg said the community is very receptive and receiving of the clinic, and they credit their hard-working staff.
“We have a great, friendly staff here,” Lenaburg said.
Kay Jenks, office manager, has worked at the clinic for 19 years.
“It’s a real close community, and we’re part of it,” Jenks said. “I feel real close to everybody that comes in here.”
The doctors give credit to their friendly staff, while Jenks in return credits the doctors for the clinic’s success.
“They just seem to bond with everybody,” she said.
Carpenter was turned onto veterinary medicine at the age of 9, when he took a trip to watch some of his family’s livestock receive treatment at the OSU veterinary hospital. He later worked at the Tecumseh Veterinary Clinic while studying to become a veterinarian.
“It’s nice to have somebody here that has local ties,” Evans said of Carpenter.
Carpenter said he was welcomed into the practice without being treated like “the new guy,” and said everyone in the community has been very receptive of his presence.
“I think our clients are some of the best in the country,” Carpenter said. “They’re really good people to work for.”
Carpenter praised Evans and Lenaburg for their professionalism, and said they are very respected within the community. Prior to taking on their respective practices in Tecumseh, Evans worked at a veterinary clinic in Hobart and Lenaburg interned for one year at a veterinary clinic in St. Louis, Mo.
Over the past 30 years, Evans said veterinary medicine has seen its share of changes and new challenges. Many ailments facing four-legged friends are more prevalent now than ever.
“We now see diseases routinely that didn’t exist 30 years ago,” Evans said.
One such disease effecting house cats is called “bobcat disease,” he said. The disease, which involves a parasitic attack on the cat’s red blood cells, comes from ticks biting house cats after they have bitten bobcats.
“It’s really a growing problem,” Evans said.
Lenaburg said bobcat disease and other tick-borne diseases are encountered more frequently today, but Evans said there are now many more antibiotics available for pets and livestock.
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Jason Smith may be reached at 214-3932 or william.j.smith@news-star.com.