Democrats and Republicans pick their choices for the U.S. Senate and Congress on Tuesday, but unlike recent elections, there is little suspense.


Democrats and Republicans pick their choices for the U.S. Senate and Congress on Tuesday, but unlike recent elections, there is little suspense.
State Election Board Secretary Michael Clingman is guessing the turnout will fall below a similar election in 2004, when about 500,000 went to the polls.
About 1.8 million registered Democrats and Republicans are registered to vote in this election and turnout is expected to be less than 30 percent.
Two years ago, the primary featured a spirited five-candidate Republican race in the 5th Congressional District, which Mary Fallin won in a runoff on her way to victory in November.
In 2004, the primary was highlighted by a three-way tussle for the Republican nomination, which Tom Coburn secured without a runoff before defeating Democrat Brad Carson in the general election.
This time around, Republican incumbent Sen. Jim Inhofe faces three candidates with little or no financing and was considered a shoe-in for the nomination. In the Democratic primary, state Sen. Andrew Rice of Oklahoma City was favored to defeat Jim Rogers, a perennial candidate.
The only other statewide race on the ballot pitted state Rep. Rob Johnson against Dana Murphy, an administrative law judge. The winner meets Democratic incumbent Jim Roth.
Three of the state’s five U.S. House members did not draw opposition for the primary — Fallin of the 5th District, Frank Lucas of the 3rd District and Tom Cole of the 4th District.
Democrats Bert Smith and Steven L. Perry of Oklahoma City were vying for the Democratic nomination to oppose Fallin.
Democrat Dan Boren of the 2nd Congressional District and Republican John Sullivan of the 1st District were overwhelming favorites in their primaries.
Businesswoman Georgianna W. Oliver and protest leader Mark Manley squared off for the Democratic nomination in the 1st District.