With a pair of collapsed structures to contend with, City Manager Jim Thompson said Friday that the city is inching closer to getting both issues resolved in the near future.

The half-collapsed building on Broadway may not have done as much damage as was previously suspected, Thompson said. He said the two adjacent buildings, once feared to be lost after both were maimed during the May 16 partial collapse of the structure at 111 N. Broadway, appear to be salvageable.


With a pair of collapsed structures to contend with, City Manager Jim Thompson said Friday that the city is inching closer to getting both issues resolved in the near future.
The half-collapsed building on Broadway may not have done as much damage as was previously suspected, Thompson said. He said the two adjacent buildings, once feared to be lost after both were maimed during the May 16 partial collapse of the structure at 111 N. Broadway, appear to be salvageable.
“What they’re going to do is go in there and rebuild the party wall the buildings share,” Thompson said. “So, it appears right now, depending on a report from the engineers, that the buildings to the north and south won’t have to come down.”
Thompson did not know the cause of the collapse Friday but should learn more when officials finish investigating, he said.
Some business owners and tenants affected by the collapse were allowed to enter their spaces to retrieve belongs but the damaged buildings remained closed Friday due to safety concerns.
What to do about the collapsed bridge on N. Sixth Street, which is impacting numerous homeowners in the area, will have wait until the June Tecumseh City Council meeting, Thompson said.
“We’re probably looking at putting a steel bridge across it and we’ve got it cleaned out and ready,” he said. “But there’s nothing we can do right now until the council makes its decision on how to proceed.”
The bridge on Sixth Street collapsed Monday after time and the elements took their toll on the culverts underneath the structure, Thompson said earlier in the week.
“Over the years, erosion under the tin horns washed everything away and they just collapsed,” Thompson said.
Tin horns are large culverts that allow water to pass under a bridge, he said.
There were no reported injuries in either collapse, Thompson confirmed earlier this week, although he said impact to local residents using the bridge should be considerable.
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Andrew Knittle may be reached at 214-3926.