Pottawatomie County citizen Pete Pendley took the city of McLoud to court this week in an attempt to dissolve the city and change the name from McLoud to Pendleyville.


Pottawatomie County citizen Pete Pendley took the city of McLoud to court this week in an attempt to dissolve the city and change the name from McLoud to Pendleyville.

Pottawatomie County Associate District Judge John Gardner affirmed the city of McLoud’s right to annex or deannex land in and around the city by confirming McLoud City Clerk Kay Heinz’s decision to disqualify petitions as insufficient.

McLoud City Manager Larry Dillon said Pendley typed up about 12 erroneous petitions in an attempt to dissolve McLoud as a city, dating back to 1895.

“State law is very specific, and only cities have the right to rezone property, split lots, annex or deannex,” Dillon said. “It is the city council’s decision to annex or deannex, not the citizens.”

He said Pendley wanted to put the annexation up for a vote, so citizens of McLoud would have the right to decide whether to annex the city, and dissolve its name.

Dillon said the trip to court Tuesday cost the city of McLoud $5,000, and his valuable time as city manager, along with that of Mayor Jon Barrett, Heinz and McLoud’s attorney, Mike Warwick.

“We had to pay our attorney and we lost a lot of productive work hours,” he said.

McLoud plans on taking this case up with the Pottawatomie County district attorney’s office to file suit for time and money lost, Dillon said.

“Mr. Pendley’s residence is just a dump and not habitable, you couldn’t live there if you wanted to and no one has lived there for a long time,” Dillon said. “Myself, the mayor and the police chief all three went out there at separate times, and if you walk in the place, there is nothing there but spiders and rats.”

Dillon said the property is obviously abandoned, and Pendley basically lied in court, by saying he lived there, making him an electorate, and ultimately giving him the opportunity to take McLoud to court in an attempt to dissolve the city.

“He told the judge that he was a city resident and lived in the city,” Dillon said. “He’s lied about where his residence is, he’s lied about his voter registration, so we are going to ask the DA to have his office investigated, and prosecute as warranted.”

Dillon said he was frustrated that someone like Pendley wants to influence a nice community like McLoud in a negative way.
McLoud Mayor Jon Barrett said Pendley could make two choices: he could be a positive influence or he could be a negative influence on McLoud.

“There’s a certain group of people that you are never going to convince, so you don’t waste your time trying to convince them,” Barrett said. “But, they do have the First Amendment constitutional right, and the key to that is, that you can say what you want, but you better say the truth.”

Barrett said as mayor, he’s had good days and has had bad days. He said he’s had chicken and he’s had feathers.

“The city of McLoud is an entity that has been here since 1895, and there is no compunction to live here,” Barrett said. “There is nothing that says that any one of us need to live here. We live here on our own free will and our choice.”