Witches, mythological creatures, talking animals, alternate worlds and teen politics. This may sound like a high school Halloween party on LSD, but it’s actually key plot aspects of Deborah Winter-Blood’s new book: “The Glendale Witch.”


Witches, mythological creatures, talking animals, alternate worlds and teen politics. This may sound like a high school Halloween party on LSD, but it’s actually key plot aspects of Deborah Winter-Blood’s new book: “The Glendale Witch.”

Winter-Blood, a Shawnee resident, spent more than a year working on the book and received the final product on Oct. 13, right in time for Halloween. Perfect timing for a book about a teenaged witch who has to save relatives from demons, Winter-Blood said.

“It’s not physically in stores yet, but the online response has been tremendous. It’s been startling,” Winter-Blood said.

Winter-Blood is a West Coast transplant who has called Shawnee home for more than four years and identifies with pagans and nature-based religion, which is at the core of her book.

“The book deals with issues that are important to women, not that they aren’t important to men also,” Winter-Blood said. “It’s got several love stories.”

The book examines an array of topics from good and evil, environmental issues, to family and love issues that play out over the backdrop of witchcraft. Though the main character is a 17-year-old witch, the book is not akin to Harry Potter or Sabrina the Teenage Witch. The book has a more accurate portrayal of witches and Pagan beliefs than the more commercially successful counterparts, Winter-Blood said.

“In the conversations between characters, I have them make mention of the fact that there is no absolute good or evil. Creatures are defined by their actions. Nobody is born good or evil,” she said.

The book has received overwhelmingly positive reviews from the targeted demographic of 13 to 17-year-olds, as well as a huge response from 40 to 50-year-old readers as well, Winter-Blood said.

She said the key is to write with respect for the reader, regardless of their age.

Once she developed her idea for the book, the actual writing took about four months at 5,000 words a week for the first draft.

Winter-Blood’s partner, Mickey Mills, is also a self-published author and helped plant the seed for the book in Winter-Blood’s head. He serves as the webmaster for her website, her graphic designer and the surrogate father of their two dogs.

Winter-Blood and Mills are an inherently non-traditional duo that have subverted the established book-publishing market and printed their books themselves. They do their own marketing and currently have deals with websites such as Amazon, Itunes, Smash Words and Barnes and Noble.

“The traditional book publishing industry is going through so many changes because of the Internet,” Winter-Blood said. “Unless you’re already an established author ... it’s almost impossible to find an agent and publisher.”

Now that she has the final product, Winter-Blood has an international marketing plan. She will be doing an Internet radio interview this evening at 5:30 at extremewritingnow.com, and has a London-based interview on Nov. 23.

She also recently sold her first international copy in Canada.

The book is available for every digital format. Autographed copies of the book are also available at her website, the glendalewitch.com.