The city of Shawnee water treatment plant will use chlorine to disinfect city drinking water and flush out residue buildup in the water lines in early November. City water will be safe to drink during the treatment, city officials said.


The city of Shawnee water treatment plant will use chlorine to disinfect city drinking water and flush out residue buildup in the water lines in early November. City water will be safe to drink during the treatment, city officials said.
“We are just going to do a maintenance on the distribution system as far as exhausting all of the ammonia that may be in the system,” official Steve Nelms said. “
Choloramines, a combination of chlorine and ammonia, are typically used to reduce the amount of trihalomethanes (THM) that build up in the water system.
The THM are carconogenic and are byproducts of disinfectants and organic and inorganic matter in water lines, according to the Environmental Protection Agency’s website. The allowable amount of THM in water is 80 parts per billion, according to the EPA.
The Oklahoma Department of Environment Quality requires that water plants periodically use chlorine for two weeks to flush out residue buildup, according to city officials.
Chloramines have been used to treat water for about 90 years and the process is closely regulated by the EPA. Water that contains the compound and meets EPA standards is safe to use for drinking, cooking and bathing, according to city officials.
The chlorine “burn-out” water treatment will start Nov. 7 and last until Nov. 21.
Anyone with questions regarding the water treatment to contact the water treatment plant at 273-0890.