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The Shawnee News-Star
  • Police to teach residents survival skills for active shooter situations

  • Shawnee police will offer two training classes April 17 to teach area residents basic survival skills and other techniques should they ever encounter an active shooter situation. The classes are free and open to the public.
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    Shawnee police will offer two training classes April 17 to teach area residents basic survival skills and other techniques should they ever encounter an active shooter situation. The classes are free and open to the public.
    The two, two-hour classes will be held in the seminar room at Gordon Cooper Technology Center. The first class will be 10 a.m. to noon and the second will be 2 to 4 p.m. Each class can hold up to 300 people, so those interested in the training can show up for either class.
    Shawnee Police Sgt. Steve Leader said the two-hour presentation will cover an array of safety topics as they teach residents how to survive an active shooter situation, whether at their home, school, at a public building, or even while out shopping.
    “There will be ideas everybody can use should they come in contact with an active shooter,” Leader said.
    Leader, who said many people have never been told or would have no idea what to do in an active shooter situation, said ALICE training stands for Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, and Evacuate.
    Leader, along with Sgt. Heath Streater and Sgt. Dan Shumaker attended ALICE training in Texas recently. Now they are sharing what they learned with other law enforcement agencies, at schools and area businesses, and now they want to present the program to area residents.
    Training for the ALICE program teaches people what tactical advantages they have that can help keep them alive.
    Because the majority of casualties from active shooter events happen within the first four to 10 minutes, there’s a critical gap in time when the shooter first pulls the trigger to when police arrive, and that is the area of focus for this training, Leader said.
    History has shown that an active shooter situation goes on for about 6 to 8 minutes, he said, with the sound of the first gunshot being the only alert for many to call for police.
    Police response can take a few minutes, so in those waiting minutes, officers want to teach people what to do, such as techniques to lock down and barricade in a room if needed.
    For ALICE, the “A” is for Alert, such as sounding an alarm of the situation and calling the police, while passing all information by any and all means, including public address systems.
    Lockdown, or sheltering in place, means that doors should be locked to provide a time barrier and give students and teachers time to recognize the threat. If they aren’t in a danger area, they should evacuate.
    The “I” is for Inform, which means keeping everyone up to date on the shooter’s location.
    Page 2 of 2 - The “C” — Counter — is for countering the attacker as a last resort by interrupting the physical act of the shooting if necessary. If a shooter walks into a classroom or hall and there is no escape route, persons should begin throwing anything and everything at them to interrupt the shooting and accuracy, according to ALICE information. This is a last resort as survival process.
    The “E” is for evacuate.
    Anyone in the community who is interested in taking this training is encouraged to attend one of the two programs on April 17.
     
     
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