|
|
|
The Shawnee News-Star
  • Getting away for a while

  • Lately, I’ve been thinking it would be nice to travel and go on an adventure or two – go hiking in the woods or searching for seaglass on some beach somewhere.
    • email print
      Comment
  • Lately, I’ve been thinking it would be nice to travel and go on an adventure or two – go hiking in the woods or searching for seaglass on some beach somewhere.
    This is not something that is likely to happen any time soon.
    This is also where one of my favorite hobbies comes into play. Sure, books don’t physically transport me anywhere, and they’re no replacement for actually getting out there and living. But they are a first-class way to relax, and a pretty decent form of escape.
    Just the other day I visited 12th century England, Westeros, and 221B Baker Street. (I’ve never been much good at deciding on only one book to read.)
    Tomorrow . . . who knows?
    It’s nice sometimes to read about other people, places, times and even worlds.
    Television shows and movies are fun, and I have friends who enjoy video games and roll playing games. When it comes down to it, though, I’ll take words on a page any day.
    I had a friend who used to despair of my reading choices. “You’re such an escapist,” he’d say, all the while shoving Hunter S. Thompson and Bernard Malamud at me.
    And while I could get through the latter more or less unscathed, the former was the exact definition of a writer I just cannot personally appreciate.
    People will just have to shake their heads in disapproval that I keep reading fantasy novels and fairy tales and all manner of stories that just aren’t “literary” enough for some.
    That’s fine by me. My thoughts are more in line of those of J.R.R. Tolkien, who wrote, “I have claimed that Escape is one of the main functions of fairy-stories, and since I do not disapprove of them, it is plain that I do not accept the tone of scorn or pity with which ‘Escape’ is now so often used. Why should a man be scorned if, finding himself in prison, he tries to get out and go home? Or if he cannot do so, he thinks and talks about other topics than jailers and prison-walls?”
    There’s a man who understood the power of stories.

        calendar