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The Shawnee News-Star
  • PEDV affects pigs across United States

  • The Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus, or PEDV, is estimated to have killed 8 million pigs in the United States since April. Previously, the virus had not been detected in the US.
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  • The Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus, or PEDV, is estimated to have killed 8 million pigs in the United States since April. Previously, the virus had not been detected in the US.
    According to porkcares.org, a website launched by the National Pork Board, the National Pork Producers Council and state organizations representing farmers, the virus does not pose a risk to other animals or humans.
    Kyle Robinson, Oklahoma State University Agriculture and 4-H Youth Development Extension Educator, said that in Oklahoma and the rest of the nation, there are economical impacts.
    “The main thing that’s causing the virus is how easily it’s being transferred,” he said. “It’s being transferred through the feces.”
    The virus does not make pork unsafe for people to eat, but it has driven up pork prices. Frank Oliver, owner of Hardesty Grocery & Market, said that in the past 30 days, prices have risen approximately 5 to 10 percent. 
    Robinson said he mostly works with show pigs.
    “With the shows and sales, it’s bringing up some challenges just because within those scenarios, you have to commingle the pigs,” he said.
    Robinson said the pork council has done a good job of educating people on proper biosecurity.
    “Basically, your equipment needs to be sanitized and you do not share it with any other exhibitors,” he said. “All the shows and sales generally have a veterinarian on site that inspects the animals before they get off the trailer.”
    Everyone tries to keep the pigs as isolated as possible, Robinson said.
    “The idea is you treat everything as if it’s been contaminated,” he said.
    Robinson said that infected pigs should be quarantined seven to 30 days, and that 30 days is recommended. As far as he knows, the spread of the virus has not kept people from showing and selling pigs.
    “Everybody’s just being more cautious,” Robinson said. “As far as the purebred show industry, it has been relatively unharmed, especially compared to the commercial.”

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