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The Shawnee News-Star
  • Doctor gives summer safety tips

  • Although the summer started off rather mildly, Pottawatomie County is expecting temperatures in the triple digits this weekend. The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory to remain in effect until 7 p.m. tonight.
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  • Although the summer started off rather mildly, Pottawatomie County is expecting temperatures in the triple digits this weekend. The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory to remain in effect until 7 p.m. tonight.
    Dr. Carlos Cabrera, a doctor in St. Anthony Shawnee Hospital’s emergency room, said that people should carry liquids with them all the time when outdoors. 
    Three people were admitted in the ER this week with heat related illnesses.
    “The thing is, you want to even try to avoid getting thirsty,” Cabrera said. “If you’re getting thirsty, you’re probably running behind on fluids.”
    He said many people even carry a gallon of water with them.
    “I would be drinking constantly every hour if they work outside,” he said.
    Cabrera said it only takes a couple of hours or less to become dehydrated, especially if people don’t hydrate well the night before a long day outside.
    “The night before, drink a lot of water and hydrate as much as you can,” he said. “A lot of people think sodas and juices and stuff like that counts, but it doesn’t.”
    Staying in the shade, taking breaks indoors and applying sunscreen are important measures to take when spending long periods of time outdoors. Cabrera said sunscreen should be applied every couple of hours.
    “The most important thing is to get under the shade,” he said. “It doesn’t necessarily need to be sunny. Even if it’s a little bit gloomy, you should probably wear it.”
    Cabrera said it is important to keep an eye on friends, family and coworkers. 
    “People need to seek medical attention if they start having symptoms like cramping, nausea, vomiting,” he said. “They need to see somebody because one of the most common things we see is kidney failure. They can have heat strokes, confusion and inability to walk.”
    The National Weather Service predicts temperatures with heat index values around 105 degrees this afternoon, warning that anyone exposed to extreme heat over a prolonged period of time may develop heat related illnesses. 

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