Oklahoma Finance Secretary Preston Doerflinger released figures on Tuesday, projecting another shortfall in next year's budget.

Oklahoma Finance Secretary Preston Doerflinger released figures on Tuesday, projecting another shortfall in next year's budget.

Doerflinger said the hole in next year's budget is expected to be about $868 million, or more than 12 percent of state spending, significantly more than Gov. Mary Fallin estimated last week.

Doerflinger is Fallin's chief budget negotiator and said the governor's estimate last week was made before final figures were calculated.

The budget figures also project state revenue collections won't be enough to trigger a further cut in the state's individual income tax rate from 5 percent to 4.85 percent.

The shortfall means that unless the Legislature comes up with new sources of revenue, like increased taxes, the state will have to make further cuts to services like public schools, health care and public safety.

State Sen. Ron Sharp, R-Shawnee, who has proposed a bill for teacher pay raises — said the budget shortfall is definitely going to be a problem.

He said the deficit could end up being anywhere from $600 million to $1 billion.

“We've simply taken on too many programs without creating revenue streams to pay for them,” he said Tuesday.

Overall, the state's economy has expanded; the budget has grown dramatically in the last 10-15 years, going from approximately $5.2 billion to around $7 billion now, he said.

“We've added $2 billion to our budget, but we've also taken on up to $3 billion in new projects,” he said. “So, it's coming back to kick us now.”

Sharp said while the new programs are great, the state can't just move forward trying to figure out how it's going to pay for them — it has to have a plan.

“Programs like the new charter schools, all-day kindergarten, Pre-K, ODOT's 8-year plan, road improvements and prisons are wonderful, but every time we started a new program we didn't create a revenue source to pay for it,” he said. “Now we're struggling. We'll have to cut programs, which will be difficult.”

He said the state cannot continue to partially fund things.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

You can reach Vicky O. Misa at (405) 214-3962.