When Virginia was a child, their family lived in the Ada area. Her father, James W. Jones, worked at the Ada Sale Barn. Her mother, Maudie Lee Martin Jones, was kept busy keeping up with ten children. Every evening after school, the children would go to the sale barn and help clean it up for the next day’s sale. Virginia said, “My sister would take one side and I the other. Marguerite, would always find money on her side of the barn while cleaning out the papers and trash around the chairs. I wanted to trade sides so I would find some money. But she found money on that side too, and I found none.”

When Virginia was a child, their family lived in the Ada area. Her father, James W. Jones, worked at the Ada Sale Barn. Her mother, Maudie Lee Martin Jones, was kept busy keeping up with ten children. Every evening after school, the children would go to the sale barn and help clean it up for the next day’s sale. Virginia said, “My sister would take one side and I the other. Marguerite, would always find money on her side of the barn while cleaning out the papers and trash around the chairs. I wanted to trade sides so I would find some money. But she found money on that side too, and I found none.”

The Hooper children attended Jones Chapel, the little red school house that was later moved into Wintersmith Park in Ada. Most of them later went to Ada schools.

When Virginia was thirteen, her mother died of a cerebral hemorrhage. Her older sister, Marguerite was already married and living in Dallas. When Virginia turned sixteen, she became “Vickie” and along with her sister, Dorothy went to Dallas to find work. They lived with Marguerite until they found work and could get an apartment of their own. They were both working as a waitress in a downtown diner.

In early 1952, Vickie got a job at Gaines’s machine shop in Dallas. There was a man also working there called, Billy Wayne George. He asked Vickie out one day and six months later they were married. Vickie continued to work there until their son, James Odell was born in 1955. A year later, daughter, Pamela Jo, was born.

Billy found work in Oklahoma City with Western Electric in 1959, so the family moved there and rented a house in Bethany. When they left Dallas, there was Billy, Vickie, son, Dell and three year old Pamela plus the Shetland pony, Smoky. They couldn’t leave Smoky behind so Billy took the back seat out of their 1949 Mercury and Smoky rode back there while the four family members rode in the front seat from Dallas to Bethany. It was an interesting trip.

One year later, another son, Coy Quillen, was born. The family had purchased a home in 1962 , in southwest Oklahoma City, where they could rent pasture for Smoky and another pony. In January of 1963, daughter, Brenda, came along.

The children attended Western Heights Schools and were active in scouting. Vickie was a stay-at-home mom who was always there when the kids came home from school with fresh baked cookies or brownies waiting for them.

After a few years, Vickie decided to go to work at Western Electric where Billy still worked. That required that they hire a baby sitter. The four children did not like for mother to work so they created so much havoc with six baby sitters until Vickie decided that staying home would be best.

The kids loved pizza, but Billy did not. On weekends Billy would go coon hunting and while he was gone, Vickie and the kids enjoyed pizza and drive-in movies. Billy kept his coon dogs in their back yard. He had eight grown dogs. One was called, “Blue.” Blue had eight puppies. During a hunting trip, Billy’s dogs killed a mama coon. Billy found her four babies that still did not have their eyes open so he brought them home. They put the four baby coons with Blue and her eight puppies and they became a happy family. Blue raised her eight puppies and the four little coons.

The Georges purchased an acreage near Harjo and the kids went to school at Tecumseh. During this time, Dell joined the Navy. Five years later the rest of the family moved back to Oklahoma City and the kids finished their secondary schooling there.

Vickie went to work for the Oklahoma City school system as a cook and then as Cafeteria Manager. She later worked for Midwest City Schools as secretary for the Food Services Director. She retired in 1988.

Pam married and moved to Tecumseh in 1974. Eleven years later, Billy passed away from Cancer.

Vickie was still living in Oklahoma City. She met Charles Hooper who was a member of Oak Crest Church of Christ where they both were members of the church singles group. They married on Valentine’s Day in 1986 and continued to live in Vickie’s home there in Oklahoma City.

Charles was an avid OU fan and they went to all the games in Norman and many of them in other states. They even attended some of the bowl games. He had family in Georgia and they traveled to visit with them.

After Vickie retired, she worked part time for the State of Oklahoma as a clerk in what was called then, The State Unemployment Agency. She worked there until 2010. By that time she needed to be at home with Charles.

In 2011, her daughter, Brenda passed away and that same year, Vickie, Charles and son, Dell moved to Tecumseh to be near daughter, Pam, because of their failing health.

Charles died in December 2015, and Dell passed away in 2016. In August of that same year Vickie moved to Primrose Retirement Community. Vickie said,” There is a nice environment at Primrose and I enjoy the social life here.”

Note: Story submitted by Pat Gaines on behalf of Primrose.