Shawnee’s Fire Station No. 2, at 1401 N. Bryan St., has just been pared down to its frame to make way for an intensive remodeling effort to correct recurrent mold issues that have plagued the building since its original construction in 1999.

Shawnee’s Fire Station No. 2, at 1401 N. Bryan St., has just been pared down to its frame to make way for an intensive remodeling effort to correct recurrent mold issues that have plagued the building since its original construction in 1999.

Repeated mold issues — caused by ongoing water leaks and drainage problems — had the city facing a decision whether to spend an estimated $1.2 million to fix the problems, or shell out $2.2 million to replace the building altogether; when the station originally was finished, it cost the city $450,000 to build.

When Station No. 2 was, once again, forced out of commission, its crew this time moved back into a former fire station site in the 1200 block of East Main.

The structure was assessed by Don Collins, based out of South Carolina, at City Manager Justin Erickson’s request after the building’s most recent bout with mold in Fall 2015.

In his report, Collins raised an extensive list of concerns, both inside and out.

In September 2008 the fire station was shuttered for about six months to complete roof repairs and mold remediation. The station received new ceiling tiles, new carpet and some lower portions of the walls that were affected by mold got new sheetrock. Department personnel and equipment were split between Station No. 1, at city hall, and Station No. 3, at MacArthur and Oklahoma Streets, while work was being done. Overall, both the roof and remediation projects for that incident cost about $34,000.

For many months, the

Shawnee Fire Department has worked in the design and design development phases of the project with the goal of correcting all water intrusion problems, addressing current and future department operational needs and shooting for a minimum of 40 years of usability, once complete.

Shawnee Fire Chief Dru Tischer said the plan calls for demolition of the current building down to the pre-engineered "red-iron" structure and concrete slab, expansion of the apparatus bay and construction of an updated fire station from that point.

In May, from five submitted bids, City Commissioners unanimously awarded acontract to Jim Cooley Construction of Oklahoma City in the amount of

$1,309,620 for the construction phase of the project.

The price included the base bid price - at $974,000 - plus several alternates, such as an entry tower; steel trellis; painted steel casework; exterior brick veneer; concrete slab finish; a brick screen wall; glass overhead doors; and site work.

Tischer said the proposed time of completion is 275 days.

He said he is very pleased with the overall look and projected durability of the building.

Tischer said he is confident the new building, once completed, should last a good 40-plus years.