Chief of Police William Sims was reinstated to his position on November 22, 1907, by order of District Judge W.N. Maben, after a motion from Sims' lawyers. The judge held that the complaint on which Sims was suspended from office was brought by private parties. He said that information was required of the county before an official could be suspended from office, pending his trial for malfeasance.

SIMS REINSTATED AS CHIEF OF POLICE

Chief of Police William Sims was reinstated to his position on November 22, 1907, by order of District Judge W.N. Maben, after a motion from Sims’ lawyers. The judge held that the complaint on which Sims was suspended from office was brought by private parties. He said that information was required of the county before an official could be suspended from office, pending his trial for malfeasance.

This information was filed by former District Attorney Sargent P. Freeling before Judge B.F. Burwell after Sims had already been suspended. However, it was suspected that his trial was still in the future and would not go away. Yet, even with this, he would still be reinstated until further change of status.

SALOONERS LOSE ANOTHER BATTLE

A petition was filed in District Court in Oklahoma City on November 25, by 20 saloon keepers, asking that a temporary “restraining order” be issued. The plea was to get the state and county officials to stop enforcing the prohibition article of the new state Constitution, until the legality might be determined in a court of law.

The plea was defeated by Judge George W. Clark. It was determined that it would be appealed to the State Supreme Court.

SIMS CASE ENCOUNTERS A SNAG FROM MAYOR STEARNS

When the regular monthly pay warrants were made out for the city employees at the end of November, Chief of Police William Sims had a bill of salary for the time that he was suspended from office pending his trial for malfeasance.

When the warrant for $500 was presented to Mayor Frank P. Stearns for his signature, he refused to sign it. He stated that the city had already paid one man for the work and that he thought the officials had no legal right to pay out any more until the case was disposed of in court.

City Clerk A.D. Martin was willing to sign the warrant, having been advised to do so by City Attorney P.O. Cassidy. This raised another question, since Cassidy was also adviser to Sims in his hearings and acted as one of his counsel in the defense. The issue would continue for several more weeks before resolved.

NO MORE SUNDAY SHOWS FOR SHAWNEE

Deputy Sheriff M.D. Day gave notice to all play houses of the city that Sunday shows would not be tolerated. They were warned to book no shows and to cancel any arrangements that were scheduled.

An interesting twist to the story goes like this. Deputy Day as a councilman, voted to allow the Sunday shows. As a county officer, he saw his duty clear to order them closed. He simply said it was his duty to enforce the law, regardless of personal opinion.

FARRALL SALARY CASE GOES TO SUPREME COURT

The case of ex-Mayor James T. Farrall versus the City of Shawnee, involving his attempt to recover his salary while he was suspended, was headed to the State Supreme Court. He was asking to recover money for salary during the time in which he was illegally suspended from office. Special Judge J.H. Wahl, took it under advisement and rendered that it would be referred to the Supreme Court. The case was of unusual importance.

Farrall, while mayor, was removed from office pending the trial of certain charges made against himself and members of the city council. All the members of the council, except one, resigned, and Farrall was also removed. Later, the case was dropped because of lack of evidence in the charges. Suit was then entered by Farrall to recover his wages, which he claimed was due him in the circumstances.

100,000 CLUB MEETS AT BECKER THEATRE

A public meeting was held for the “100,000 Club,” the official booster club of Shawnee, on Friday night, January 10, 1908. Many people joined the organization before the meeting.

There was an initial membership of around 250 people. It was opened to anyone who was willing to pay a one-dollar a month fee until the state capital was located in the city. Every cent was pledged toward the efforts of securing the state government in Shawnee.

Frank P. Stearns, current mayor, was selected as the permanent president; A.M. Coffin was secretary; and S.C. Vinson as treasurer. An executive committee was also formed, consisting of John Kerker, George McKinnis, I.C. Van Antwerp, J. Marvin Remington, John Lane, H.M. Ticknor, Dr. H.M. Bailey, Wallace Mann, A.H. Gossling, Dr. J.H. Scott, James M. Aydelotte, C.W. Johnson, J.W. Rubey, Dr. J.C. Mahr, George W. Kerfoot, and president of the Chamber of Commerce, Sidney J. Roy.

SANTA FE BRAKEMAN KILLED IN THE SOUTH YARDS

Harry Beacham, a Santa Fe brakeman was run over and killed in the south yards on January 15, 1908. He was crossing one of the many tracks in the yard, going around a string of cars, when a switch engine bumped into the string, running a car over the unfortunate man. His leg was crushed, and he suffered many internal injuries.

He breathed his last at the Shawnee Hospital a few hours later. He was conscious all the time. Beacham was 28 years of age and had been working for Santa Fe as a brakeman for only a few weeks.

SLAYER OF CHIEF FARRALL GETS 99 YEARS

John Curtis Barber, the slayer of Chief of Police Marion Farrall, back in October of 1907, was found guilty of murder in the first degree and was given a sentence of 99 years in the penitentiary. The jury heard the case during a three-day trial.

The jury retired as soon as County Attorney Virgil Biggers closed his address on January 23, 1908. They took only one ballot. They returned the verdict into court by 4 P.M. Barber appeared unmoved when he heard the verdict.

(These stories and hundreds more will appear in the coming publication of “Redbud City,” the comprehensive history of the city of Shawnee. Probable publication is in 2019. It will contain more than 1,000 pages, fully indexed with people and places for easy reference, and a Glossary containing former office holders in the city and county. It will also contain a Memorial/Tribute section, where citizens may insert a tribute to their parents, or whatever they choose. It will also be available for tributes to civic clubs and businesses of today and in the past.)