According to the National Weather Service, at weather.gov, when Oklahomans leave 2017 behind they will be making a frigid exit. Residents should prepare for the cold and take precautions.

According to the National Weather Service, at weather.gov, when Oklahomans leave 2017 behind they will be making a frigid exit. Residents should prepare for the cold and take precautions.

Sunday's forecast looks to take a cold turn — showing a projected high of 22 and a low of 7 degrees for New Year's Eve revelers, and New Year's Day could only see a high of 19 degrees — dropping back to 8 degrees overnight.

Tuesday temps may bump up only a little — sporting a high near 27 degrees before falling again to 17 degrees overnight.

Wednesday could bring with it sun and highs in the upper 30s.

Pets

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, at avma.org, pets' cold tolerance can vary from pet to pet based on their coat, body fat stores, activity level, and health, but long stays in below-freezing temps are too harsh for them.

The website states, “it's a common belief that dogs and cats are resistant than people to cold weather because of their fur, but it's untrue.”

Like people, cats and dogs are susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia and should be kept inside, the site reads.

“Longer-haired and thick-coated dog breeds, such as huskies and other dogs bred for colder climates, are more tolerant of cold weather; but no pet should be left outside for long periods of time in below-freezing weather,” AVMA reports.

The site reports cold weather may worsen some medical conditions, such as arthritis.

“Arthritic and elderly pets may have more difficulty walking on snow and ice and may be more prone to slipping and falling,” the website reads.

Also, companion animals aren't the only animals in need of protection during the winter months.

Livestock, including horses, have their own unique considerations and needs when the weather gets colder, the site reads.

Vehicles

With colder mornings, drivers are more likely to wake up to tire pressure issues or dead car batteries.

Each year, AAA reports it rides to the rescue of approximately 32 million stranded motorists across the country.

If traveling is a must, motorists are advised to prepare a winter emergency kit now and stow in the trunk of their vehicle to have immediately available should the need arise. More than 40 percent of motorists do not carry an emergency kit in their vehicle, cautions AAA Oklahoma.

• Emergency kit items to include — de-icer, shovel, ice scraper, warning flare or bright triangle, flashlight with fresh batteries, first aid kit, jumper cables and sand or kitty litter (for traction).

• Pack a blanket, extra gloves and heavy but light-colored jacket, scarf or hat (so you can be seen if you have to get out of your vehicle) — if you’re stuck on the road for an extended period of time you’ll need to stay warm, especially if your vehicle is not running.

• Pack snacks and beverages.

• AAA also recommends checking tire pressure since tires need more air when it is cold. Proper cold weather tire pressure can be found in the vehicle manual or on a sticker inside the driver’s door, not on the tire itself.

• AAA says the average car battery lasts 3-5 years, and even at 32 degrees, a car battery is 35-percent weaker.