A large and enthusiastic crowd attended a meeting of the Fidelity Building & Loan Association on July 19, 1912. The preliminary organization was perfected, after which a permanent company was established. The following officers were elected at the meeting: President, W.T. Leahy; First Vice-President, A.G. Eakins; Second Vice President, H.H. Gray; Secretary-Treasurer, George E. McKinnis; and General Attorney, Edward Howell.

BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION LAUNCHED

A large and enthusiastic crowd attended a meeting of the Fidelity Building & Loan Association on July 19, 1912. The preliminary organization was perfected, after which a permanent company was established. The following officers were elected at the meeting: President, W.T. Leahy; First Vice-President, A.G. Eakins; Second Vice President, H.H. Gray; Secretary-Treasurer, George E. McKinnis; and General Attorney, Edward Howell.

The company was met with great encouragement from the city of Shawnee. The board of trustees consisted of some of the most respected businessmen in the community. The capital stock began at $50,000, divided into shares of $100 each. The shares could be purchased at the rate of one dollar per month.

The need for a business and loan company was recognized in the city for a long time. The plan was based upon the laboring man’s method of saving, and they would be arranged in that manner. It was believed because of the large number of railroad employees, along with business and professional men, the organization would be successful.

WOMEN RECOGNIZE “WHITE SLAVERY” IN SHAWNEE

Resolutions were adopted by the County Women’s Christian Temperance Union (W.C.T.U.) Convention in session at Shawnee during the week of September 2-6, 1912. They declared the presence of the “white slavery” traffic in the city and warned mothers to be on their guard against its evils. It was developing around the parks. The resolutions were as follows:

RESOLVED: “That we consider this one of the best county conventions it has been our pleasure to attend and do greatly render praise and thanksgiving to our Heavenly Father for His many blessings and guidance during the past year and we pray that God will give us continued victories for prohibition.”

RESOLVED: “That we enter a vigorous campaign against the evil that goes on at the parks and the white slave traffic. The recent investigation and exposure have shown without a doubt that the white slave traffic is in Pottawatomie County. We urge and plead with all Christian mothers to show the danger and to try to show a higher standard of living.”

NEW PRESIDENT OF THE BAPTIST CONVENTION

Rev. S.C. Stubblefield of Ada was unanimously elected president of the Oklahoma Baptist Convention during the first week of November 1912. He was a striking figure among the preachers of the denomination in the state. He was universally beloved by ministers and laymen alike, who delighted to honor him with this position.

While Stubblefield was a very unassuming and modest character, he was of a philosophical turn of mind. When interviewed by a News-Herald reporter, it was clearly distasteful for him to yield, but he did with good grace.

“I felt the impulse to enter the ministry,” he said, “when I lived down at Waco, Texas, more than 40 years ago. I threw if off, however, and continued to resist it for 16 years. To get farther from the influence of this impulse, I entered the railroad contracting business, which brought me to the Indian Territory. Twenty-five years ago, my beloved wife fell critically ill. The doctors gave her up and said that she was dying. Very sore at heart, I went out of the house and knelt down and prayed. I had lost my former wife by death, and I just told the Lord that if my refusal to answer the call to the ministry was the cause of my great affliction, I would begin preaching at once. I went back into the house and found that my wife had rallied. From that moment, she improved and was soon completely restored to health. That was 25 years ago. I have been preaching ever since.”

During his 25 years of pastorate, Stubblefield had but four charges: Ardmore, Durant, Duncan, and Ada. In his career, he had never had a single adverse vote cast against him. Each change of churches was against united demands of his people. Twenty-two years earlier he and others organized the State Mission Board, of which he was chairman and had been a member ever since. The first year the board handled $350; the past year it dealt with $44,000.

SHAWNEE PROTESTS TO ASSOCIATION

The formal protest of the canceling of the game of football by Chickasha with Shawnee, which was scheduled to be played on November 15, was lodged with the executive board of the Oklahoma High School Athletic Association. Sometime earlier, the contract for the game was approved and signed by both schools. It provided for the game to be played at Shawnee.

While the contract was never returned to the senders until November 8, it had been verbally agreed upon. After the Chickasha coach was in town to scout a game between Shawnee and Oklahoma City, he apparently decided he did not want to play Shawnee. His team was undefeated and allegedly felt a loss to Shawnee would taint their claim as the state champions. There were no “playoffs” in those days.

The Shawnee High School football team had a wonderful season, basically destroying all high school teams. The only exception was a narrow loss at Norman. Their schedule was: a win over East Central Normal College, 51-0; victory over Lawton, 79-0; a romping of Oklahoma City, 45-6; a loss to Oklahoma A&M Second Team, 0-32; a narrow loss at Norman, 3-0; the forfeit from Chickasha, 1-0; a tie with Kingfisher, 0-0; and finally, a drubbing of Mangum, 41-0. They finished the season with a (5-2-1) record. This raised the school’s all-time record to (14-21-3). The team was coached by George Doughtery.

HEAD BLOWN OFF IN ACCIDENTAL DISCHARGE OF GUN

Otis Ricks, 16-year-old son of J.B. Ricks, a farmer living east of the city, had his head blown off Christmas Day by the accidental discharge of a shotgun. Death was instantaneous. The tragedy occurred in the presence of almost a dozen friends of the boy.

Ricks and other young people of the neighborhood were out hunting east of Albert Romberg’s farmhouse. Fred Emerson and Lilly Cox drove up to the scene in a buggy. Ricks stepped into the buggy to shake hands with them. At the same time leaning the gun against a wheel. In some way, the gun was discharged, presumably by the trigger striking the wheel, and the full charge entered under the right side of his chin, blowing away the entire right side of his head and face.

The entire neighborhood was shocked by the tragedy, and funeral services were held at the home. It was largely attended. Interment was in the Mission Cemetery. The dead boy was a member of the Rock Creek Baptist Church.

(These stories and hundreds more will appear in the comprehensive history of Shawnee. Volume One, 426 pages, will be available for purchase in July. It covers from 1830 and the creation of Indian Territory up to 1929. It may be purchased in traditional book form or digitally. Volume Two, covering the 1930s and 1940s, approximately the same size, should be available sometime in August. Volumes three and four are scheduled for later. Look for more details on the availability and description of Volume One on Facebook and in the News-Star.)