Her clothes burning from head to foot, the flames enveloping her head, Fannie Salyer, 23, ran from her rooms above the post office, down the steps and onto Broadway just before noon on March 24, 1914. She was seized by passers-by and the flames were extinguished, after which she was removed to the general hospital. There her wounds proved to be fatal.

YOUNG LADY BECOMES A HUMAN TORCH

Her clothes burning from head to foot, the flames enveloping her head, Fannie Salyer, 23, ran from her rooms above the post office, down the steps and onto Broadway just before noon on March 24, 1914. She was seized by passers-by and the flames were extinguished, after which she was removed to the general hospital. There her wounds proved to be fatal.

When the girl appeared upon the street, her clothing was practically burned from her body, hanging in charred and smoking patches and strips. Her flesh was literally cooked, and the efforts of those who tried to smother the fire caused great pieces of skin and flesh to drop from her body. Her luxuriant hair was burned short and her features were frightfully disfigured.

The first that persons in the vicinity knew of the accident was when screams issued from the upstairs room. Immediately afterward the unfortunate girl came heading down the stairs, her motion fanning the flames even more fiercely. M.C. Griffin, a black preacher, who was standing in front of the post office, was first to grab the girl. He threw a heavy overcoat about her and tried to smother the flames. R. Wyant and others then ran to his aid and the woman was covered with coats and blankets, the latter being secured from the Fleming-Brown Furniture Store, in front of which the woman at the time lay.

The ambulance and doctors were summoned. Small portions of the clothing that remained and the enveloping blankets were still smoldering and were not finally extinguished until the woman was carried into the hospital. By the afternoon physicians said she could not recover.

Salyer was employed at the Garment Factory but had been laid off temporarily. She lived in rooms over the post office, where several girls lived. She was cleaning some gloves with gasoline when the fuel ignited from the top burners of a gas range. With her at the time were Mrs. J.F. Stegall and Helen Eldridge. As soon as they saw the poor girl’s plight, they tried to restrain her while they put out the fire, but she broke away from them and ran down the stairs.

Salyer’s parents were formerly of Shawnee but moved three miles north and a mile east of Earlsboro. She had a brother living in Shawnee.

LARGE CROWD SAW BIG LEAGUERS PLAY IN SHAWNEE

Baseball was given an auspicious beginning for the season at Elks Park on April 10, 1914. An exhibition game was played by the Indianapolis team of the Federal League before packed grandstands. The crowd was estimated at 600.

The local club realized a fair sum out of the undertaking, thanks largely to local merchants, who very obligingly and at a sacrifice to themselves, closed their doors so businesses might not detract from the attendance. Owing to a high wind prevailing all afternoon, with gradually lowering temperatures, the event was not so enjoyable as it might have been but was generally voted a success.

Formal opening of the Inter-City League season would take place the following Sunday at Elks Park with the local team and the Halverson team of Oklahoma City. D.P. “Deepy” Sparks, manager of the Shawnee aggregation, was confident he and his associates would be able to put out a pennant winning team. All the men were in good condition and all appeared to be optimistic concerning their united ability to bring home the rag. (banner)

Sparks would again be principal catcher for the locals. With Claud Sales as utility catcher, and outfielder. Shawnee appeared to have rounded up two good pitchers in Trunnel and Gresham, the former with the Ardmore team of the Texas-Oklahoma League last year, and the latter with a team in the Central Association.

Other new players were the Indian Melot of Tecumseh, who was said to be a fast man in any infield position, and Charlie Price, the local high lad, who was doing some spectacular work with the school team. Leonard Sales would play second base; Bill Brooks, third; with Watson and C. Sparks as the other two outfielders. Hughes was the utility infielder.

All the games were played on Sundays with 22 on the schedule at home, which gave Shawnee a game almost every Sunday. Two games were scheduled at El Reno and two at Oklahoma City.

SHAWNEE SEEKS PLACE ON OZARK TRAILS

The Chamber of Commerce met for dinner on May 17,1914 and took up the question of attending the Ozark Trails Association Convention in Tulsa on May 26-27. The association was engaged in the building and marking of roads all over the eastern part of Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas, and the Gulf Highway. They were discussing a line that would traverse almost the entire state of Oklahoma.

The connecting line was not yet located, and the locals said they believed there was no better course than to come southwest out of Tulsa. The line should run through Okmulgee, on to Holdenville, Seminole, Shawnee, and then on to Oklahoma City. It was considered as a route that would take the Trail (highway) through the best farming counties and the principal cities of the central part of the state.

Some commented that the “good roads” movement was promoted by automobilists, but it went much further than that. It would mean traffic through these towns that would greatly increase their economies.

(These stories and hundreds more appear in “Redbud City: Shawnee in the Early Years, 1830-1929” now available for sale at the Pottawatomie County Historical Society. It is 426 pages in length, with hundreds of photos from that era. It is fully indexed with over 2,400 names and more than 1,000 businesses and organizations. It also includes a glossary of former office holders and a memorial/tribute section to pay honor to the subject of the page. There are only 500 copies printed and they are going fast. If you would like one, please hurry to get your copy. They are $55, plus tax. They are also available on flash-drives for $35. Volume Two will be available around Christmas time, covering the 1930s and 1940s. Volume Three will cover 1950 through 1979, and will be available in late 2019. Volume Four covers the 1980s and 1990s and is scheduled for publication in 2020. The Fifth and final volume is the 21st century and look for it in 2021-22.)