A Wanette man who was allegedly driving nearly 100 miles per hour in a no passing zone while under the influence has been charged with first-degree manslaughter for his involvement in a deadly wreck that claimed the life of a Byars man last November.

A Wanette man who was allegedly driving nearly 100 miles per hour in a no passing zone while under the influence has been charged with first-degree manslaughter for his involvement in a deadly wreck that claimed the life of a Byars man last November.

Marshall Dylan McBride, 20, is formally charged in Pottawatomie County District Court, court documents show.

He is accused, on or about Nov. 17, 2017, and without a pre-meditated design, of causing the death of William V. Frankovich, 51.

Charges allege McBride was driving a 2001 Chevrolet pickup while under the influence of an intoxicating substance in the area of SH 39 and Bethel Road and did propel that vehicle into a 2007 Dodge driven by Frankovich.

According to the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, Frankovich was pronounced dead at the scene by the state medical examiner.

The crash occurred about 7:18 a.m. Nov. 17. Troopers said a 2001 Chevy Silverado driven by McBride was traveling eastbound on State Highway 39 and was attempting to pass another vehicle in oncoming traffic.

At the time, the Dodge driven by Frankovich was westbound. The OHP said Frankovich took evasive action to avoid the pickup at the same time McBride also took evasive action. The pickup departed the roadway to the right and the Dodge departed roadway to the left, resulting in the vehicles striking each other head on, the patrol reported.

Frankovich was pinned in the wreckage about three hours before being freed by the Wanette and Asher Fire Departments.

McBride was transported by REACT EMS to Norman Regional Hospital with head, trunk internal, trunk external, and leg injuries, where he was treated and then released.

Neither driver had passengers. Cause of the collision by the OHP was listed as improper passing. Seat belts were in use by both drivers, the OHP said.

As part of the charges, a $50,000 arrest warrant has been issued in the case. That affidavit shows the area of the crash was a no-passing zone, with the event data recorder in McBride's vehicle showing he was traveling 90 to 97 miles per hour five seconds before impact; he reduced his speed to 56 to 61 mph one second prior to impact.

Further, the affidavit shows that McBride was driving those speeds on tires found to have almost no tread. Toxicology screening was performed on McBride, the affidavit shows, to which two compounds associated with psychoactive effect cannabis were found, which causes impairment, the court document alleges.

“EMS that evaluated McBride observed that he had an elevated pulse rate and elevated blood pressure, both of which are indicators of the drug class associated with cannabis....,” the warrant reads, with information indicating he also had bloodshot eyes.

McBride told investigators he was running late for work, according to the warrant.