Though rain has slowed progress a bit, Fire Station No. 2 is creeping ever closer to completion of its renovation after years of water leaks, drainage issues and mold problems.

Though rain has slowed progress a bit, Fire Station No. 2 is creeping ever closer to completion of its renovation after years of water leaks, drainage issues and mold problems.

Shawnee Fire Chief Dru Tischer said he's pleased with progress so far.

“Something I'm excited about even though it's muddy out there (this week) is all the water is far away from the building as the property will allow,” he said. “That's a new thing; I'm very excited about that.”

Contractors were scheduled to pour sidewalks this week, but rain pushed those plans back.

Tischer said once the rain stops that project will be back on track.

“The add-on (to the east side of the building) is roughly 1,000 square feet,” Tischer said. “That's going to be a big plus for us having that extra area there.”

A large retaining wall will be built along the north side of the building, he said.

Tischer said contractors are still waiting on the kitchen cabinets, which should be in mid-week.

Mill work on the windows, window panes and the lavatories was started this week, along with grinding down concrete, he said.

“Except for the locker rooms, everything is going to be sealed concrete,” he said. “That will be easiest for us to clean and keep disinfected.”

Tischer said the department's main priority was focused on getting it right this time.

“When we started this project we were really behind the 8-ball,” he said. “The station was in really bad shape.”

He said they've worked to make it functional, but something the community can be proud of.

“We are incredibly excited about this; I feel great about the work that's been done and about the plan we had going into it and the quality of work that's been done,” he said. “Obviously we've had some delays, but other than that, we feel really good about it.”

Background

Repeated mold issues — caused by ongoing water leaks and drainage problems — had the city facing a decision whether to repair the site or remodel altogether.

Choosing to tear the building down to the pre‐engineered “red‐iron” structure and concrete slab, expansion was designed to improve the apparatus bay and update the fire station from that point.

Though not all news has been positive, corrections have been made.

“The building was missing quite a bit of steel,” he said. “It has now been added. It was not up to code at all; it was not right at all.”

He said there's been a huge improvement to the site, though during the remodel the project did encounter a new issue.

Tischer said the contractor inadvertently damaged a few of the post-tension cables in the concrete pad while relocating some of the original plumbing.

He said he worked closely with the general contractor and a sub-contractor — that specializes in the type of repair — was consulted.

Overall, Tischer said he feels very good about the quality of the design and the work that has been done to this point.

The fire department's focus continues to be on ensuring this project is done right, he said.

“The end product will produce our stated goal of providing a fire station that will serve our community and fire department for a minimum of 40 years,” he said.

Watch for updates.