Anglers and water recreation enthusiasts at Seminole County’s Lake Konawa are under the ever-watchful eye of the reservoir’s constant chaperone — OG&E’s Seminole Power Plant.

According to OG&E, the plant — which resides on the lake’s west side — is the second largest of the company’s seven power plants in Oklahoma. Producing a total of 1.5 million kilowatts of power, the plant uses water from Lake Konawa to run its massive steam turbines.


Note: This is the sixth and final part of a short series on lakes in the Tri-County area.

Anglers and water recreation enthusiasts at Seminole County’s Lake Konawa are under the ever-watchful eye of the reservoir’s constant chaperone — OG&E’s Seminole Power Plant.
According to OG&E, the plant — which resides on the lake’s west side — is the second largest of the company’s seven power plants in Oklahoma. Producing a total of 1.5 million kilowatts of power, the plant uses water from Lake Konawa to run its massive steam turbines.
The process of producing electricity at the plant is pretty straightforward. Water is pulled in from the lake, then superheated by a boiler to create steam. The steam drives the turbines, and these revolutions are converted into electrical power that is subsequently transmitted to OG&E’s customers.
Once the process is complete, the steam is then condensed back into water and the cycle is repeated.
The production of electricity has no adverse affects on the lake’s fishing opportunities, and in some ways, it enhances them.
The water used to cool the plant’s steam is repeatedly collected from and returned to the reservoir, according to OG&E. Because of this process, the water near the discharge site is often considerably warmer than the surrounding water. Fish tend to congregate in this area during colder months to feast on bait fish that are attracted to the higher temperatures.
The lake also boasts ample aquatic vegetation, which fish use for shelter and concealment.
Lake Konawa is often touted as one of the state’s best fisheries for largemouth bass, and I can attest to this from personal experience.
Some years ago I went to the lake with a friend, and my very first cast into Konawa’s waters produced a fat and healthy 3-pound bass. Throughout the remainder of the afternoon, we pulled in a number of fish that weighed from 1 to 3 pounds.
Lake Konawa is currently on the list for producing one of Oklahoma’s state record fish, but it is not for a bass. Marvin Williams of Noble caught a 44-pound, 2-ounce smallmouth buffalo at the lake on Aug. 15, 2007, shattering the old record by almost six pounds.
Other species beneath Konawa’s waves include channel catfish, white bass and bluegill. State laws for fishing apply at Lake Konawa, including the need to possess a valid fishing license.
Rod-and-reel fishing is the only method allowed for taking fish at the lake.
Apart from angling, Lake Konawa offers water skiers and personal watercraft operators a place to have a fun day. The speed limit for watercraft is 40 miles per hour, and no house boats are allowed, according to OG&E.
Alcoholic beverages are prohibited, and no overnight camping is allowed. Swimming is allowed in the designated swimming area north of the dam — on the east side of the lake — but the swimming and picnic areas are closed at 10 p.m.
Fishing is not allowed from the dam, and access to the waters leading to and from the plant are restricted. Boat ramps are located north and south of the dam, and on the southwest side of the lake.
There are no fees to fish or operate watercraft at Lake Konawa.
Picnic areas, complete with grills, are located in the North Recreation Area north of the dam. Fires are allowed only in the provided grills.
Lake Konawa is a designated wildlife refuge, according to OG&E, and firearms and hunting are prohibited.
Constructed in 1968, Lake Konawa is the largest single body of water in the Tri-County area. The reservoir, located about two miles east of its namesake town, boasts 1,350 surface acres of water and 20 miles of shoreline.