Not as many fights, not as many students getting teased. All thanks to two partners.

Prague Public Schools and Prague Turning Point have teamed up to combat school bullying.


Not as many fights, not as many students getting teased. All thanks to two partners.
Prague Public Schools and Prague Turning Point have teamed up to combat school bullying.
Students at the middle school have seen an improvement in the past two years.
Sara Martin, a sixth grader, said the school did have problems with bullying before the program began.
“It’s crazy, people call people names, people push people down,” she said.
While Martin said she hasn’t been a victim she has seen others get bullied a lot.
“I thought what are they doing,” she said.
In two years, since the program began things have changed.
Wade Martin, an eighth grader, said the change has been for the better.
“When I was in sixth grade, there would be fights every day on the bus,” he said.
Once the classes were being taught to students, that kind of stuff stopped, Wade Martin said.
“Now it maybe happens once a month, if that,” he said. “It’s helped a lot of people from getting hurt.”
The program focuses on what will help students most, said Shawn Mills, an education consultant for Turning point.
“We’re seeing a decrease,” he said.
This class teaches them to report it whether they feel safe or not, he said.
“If they feel safe, they refuse it,” he said. “If they don’t feel safe, they report it right away.”
Students are taught the three Bs: the bully, the one getting bullied and the bystander, Mills said.
Brooks Thompson, a sixth grader, said he has noticed a change in attitude from students because he’s been taught how many people bullying impacts.
“What percentage are bystanders and don’t do anything about it,” he said.
What percentage are bullied, Thompson said.
“I think it’s helped me,” he said. “It’s OK to stand up to a bully and not just watch it happen and don’t do anything about it.”
Middle school counselor Stephanie Lee said the program has been successful.
“We’re doing this more to stop it before it gets out of hand,” she said.
During a presentation to the students Friday afternoon, Lee said, nationally, about 85 percent of the student body is a bystander, leaving only 15 percent as the one being bullied or the bully.
“If you bring it to us, it’s always a 99 percent turnaround, nothing happens,” she said.
She added afterward that the 15 percent bully/bullied figure is lower in Prague.
State Rep. Danny Morgan was the honored guest at the presentation where he gave a proclamation to middle school principal Jerry Martin.
“No one sees the impact of bullying,” Morgan said. “It is a very, very dangerous activity.”
He said students should be proud of the work they’ve done.
“Each and every one of you are an example to somebody,” Morgan said. “Be positive.”
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Josh Burton may be reached by calling 214-3926.