Ten minutes after Sherry Claybrook let her three dogs outside to play, she heard excruciating sounds of pain. Moments after she yelled for help, four Boy Scouts arrived in rescue mode.

Ten minutes after Sherry Claybrook let her three dogs outside to play, she heard excruciating sounds of pain. Moments after she yelled for help, four Boy Scouts arrived in rescue mode.

MiMi, Claybrook’s young black Shepherd, was in the yard with Caty, a small dog, and Zeke, a bigger mix, when evening routine fun became tangled.

Sixty feet from the trio, at her home near Independence and Union, the Saving Pets at Risk supporter thought her dogs were rolling around. As she approached in response to the screams, she saw Zeke had his teeth caught on MiMi’s collar.

“It was twisted underneath his chin, and wrapped around MiMi’s neck,” she said. “The collar was choking her and hurting his jaw.”

Caty assumed Zeke was attacking the young Shepherd and became aggressively protective, biting Zeke. Claybrook’s husband was in Tulsa, far from the scene, and she feared leaving the dogs for even a moment. Panic swept over her.

“I just started screaming bloody murder,” she replayed. “I screamed, ‘Somebody help me,’ and in a matter of seconds there was an outline on the fence.”

That outline was a group of youth from Troop 65, out of Harrah. Kevin VanZant, 14, Tanner VanZant, 12, Merrick Frichot, 15, and Travis Frichot, 14, were camping behind a nearby church for a Boy Scout event relating to hand radio skills.

“We were playing basketball behind the church and we heard screaming,” Kevin explained, “so we ran over.”

They each fell naturally into collaborative roles. Tanner went to find adults. Merrick held a light. Travis helped calm Claybrook down. Kevin worked to release the collar from MiMi’s neck.

“I pulled out my pocket knife,” he said. “It took a few minutes to work it underneath the collar.”

After cutting the material, setting the dogs free, he felt for MiMi’s pulse.

“She didn’t have any, so I started CPR on her,” Kevin detailed.

Last June, he learned CPR through a Boy Scout program. A new dog owner, Kevin recently conducted an Internet search to learn how to use those skills on a dog.

Claybrook remembers the moment a faded MiMi came to. She said the canine companion began blinking her eyes. Kevin told everyone to back up.

“I went over there and massaged her neck,” he said.

Five minutes later, the dog moved and drank some water.

“She would have died if I didn’t have any help. Zeke might have died too," Claybrook said in disbelief. “What are the odds that Troop 65 would be behind my house?”

Claybrook, immeasurably grateful, took the boys chicken and macaroni and cheese. She then went home for a heart-to-heart with MiMi.

“I said, ‘Tonight, you’re the luckiest dog in the world.’”