Orange floods the corner of MacArthur and Kickapoo. Music as its witness, the intersection has been at the mercy of street construction for weeks.

Orange floods the corner of MacArthur and Kickapoo. Music as its witness, the intersection has been at the mercy of street construction for weeks.

CD Warehouse is settled on a corner lot, where road renovations, designed to improve traffic mobility, press on.

Garrick Ragon is an eight-year employee of the buy, trade and sell shop. He mans the register as three customers enter over a span of 20 minutes. Seven patrons browse aisles of entertainment. On posters lining the walls, The Beatles and Christopher Reeve’s Superman look approvingly upon the store’s selection.

Through the window, cars are seen driving in circles around the building, trying to worm into the parking lot. Ragon says the once-paved entrances have been casualties of construction for at least two months now.

“People say ‘It sure is hard to get in here, isn’t it?’ or ‘Is this hurting business?’ and I say ‘Yes,’” he plays out. He describes impacted foot traffic as evidence. “It’s cut down a lot. I’d say 35 to 40 percent.”

To compensate for the decrease, the store implements promotions.

“On used DVDs, we’re ‘Buy 1 One, Get 1 Free,’” Ragon details. “Every once in a while, we’ll do that on used CDs too.”

For now, those tempting deals may be enough. Some customers have resorted to parking at neighboring businesses. Ragon has not discussed the situation with the other businesses, but he frequents nearby Boomarang Diner.

“I think they all know that we’re in this together,” he says.

Ragon notes CD Warehouse is the only store of its breed in a 50-mile radius. Construction, however, is only one variable in a shifting equation. With the rise of online music sales, brick-and-mortar stores are trying to find a place in a digital world.

“Music stores are going by the wayside a little bit. That hasn’t helped, and I think CD sales have gone down,” he says, adding compact discs are a driving sales force.

Ragon, owner of 1,200 records, is a vinyl enthusiast. He believes vinyl can reignite a thriving music culture.

“I’m really hopeful,” he says. “I think a lot of the young people are picking up on vinyl again."

Completion of the road construction can only add fire to music’s revival.

“It’s going to be a lot better. I know that,” Ragon says of a finished Kickapoo Street. “It just seems like they’re dragging their feet, getting it done. But I don’t know. I’m not in the construction business, so I don’t know what they go through.”

The construction and accompanying equipment, he notes, are intimidating to potential shoppers. Still, he has faith the completed project will be worth it.

“We didn’t think it would take this long,” he says, “but I hope it will make it more inviting.”