Note: This is the third in a series about a local woman on her journey to citizenship.



Five down, three to go – Sabrina Eagleston is just over halfway finished with her citizenship classes at the Shawnee Public Library.

Note: This is the third in a series about a local woman on her journey to citizenship.

 

Five down, three to go – Sabrina Eagleston is just over halfway finished with her citizenship classes at the Shawnee Public Library.

 

Eagleston, who moved to Shawnee almost five years ago after meeting her local husband in Toluca, Mexico, has been studying hard for her U.S. citizenship test.

 

Although the classes are drawing to a close soon, Eagleston still has a long road ahead of her.

 

“I have two friends that had already gone through this process,” she said. “It took them like a year because you have to send your application and the fee and it takes a little bit for them to call you back to schedule your biometrics. Then they schedule the interview and test and after that, if you pass, comes the ceremony.”

 

Eagleston said she is still worried about the fee, which she also has to pay for her older daughter.

 

“Since she is just 12, I will be taking the test for us both,” she said. “If I pass it, she becomes a citizen too.”

 

Although she has been saving for the fee, Eagleston said things keep coming up. Still, she is excited for the future.

 

“After we get that, we can get our American passports and I get to vote,” she said.

 

Still, Eagleston can’t help but be nervous.

 

“It’s kind of nerve-racking,” she said. “I feel like I would be ready, but what if I’m not?”

 

As she continues through her prep classes, Eagleston said she is learning more and more about American history.

 

“We learned about the branches of government and what each of them do and why we have 100 senators and 435 representatives,” she said. “We learned about freedom of religion and freedom of speech. That’s really interesting for my classmate and I because it’s so different.”

 

Noting the warm November temperatures, Eagleston said she likes the more detailed weather reports we get in Oklahoma.

 

“They’re always letting you know what’s going to happen,” she said. “Over there, they tell you the high and low and that’s it. I guess because we don’t get the severe weather like here.”

 

Eagleston said in Toluca, they don’t get snow or tornadoes.

 

“The worst thing we get are the earthquakes,” she said. “There’s a volcano there and they top gets snowy and it’s like a park, but we don’t get the snow on the ground.”

 

In Toluca, Eagleston worked a variety of jobs, mostly in office settings.

 

“I was an assistant,” she said. “It was a part of the state government where they make books.”

 

There, Eagleston worked with design and editing. She also worked with a public notary before that.

 

“I worked at a school,” she said. “I was teaching computers and English, which is really, really different than here. When I got here, I couldn’t understand anyone and no one could understand me.”

 

Here, Eagleston works at a Mexican restaurant.

 

“I used to work at Kohl’s and I really liked it, but I feel like working at the restaurant, I’m more involved with people and I like that,” she said. “I learn a lot, too.”

 

The citizenship class is being funded through the Oklahoma Department of Libraries with funds from Library Services and Technology, a Federal source of library funding provided by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.