A state trooper killed near Shawnee last year and two Pottawatomie County Sheriff's Deputies — one killed in 1895 and the other in 1927 — will be among nine Oklahoma law officers included as 252 new names are engraved on the National Law Enforcement Officer’s Memorial in Washington, D.C.

A state trooper killed near Shawnee last year and two Pottawatomie County Sheriff's Deputies — one killed in 1895 and the other in 1927 — will be among nine Oklahoma law officers included as 252 new names are engraved on the National Law Enforcement Officer’s Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The names will be dedicated during the 28th Annual Candle Light Vigil the evening of May 13, 2016.

Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper Nicholas G. Dees was killed January 31, 2015, when he struck by a vehicle east of Shawnee while investigating an accident along Interstate 40 in Seminole County.

The driver was texting and updating social media when he struck and killed Dees and injured another trooper. The accident prompted the state's driving while texting ban and the defendant is now serving a prison term for manslaughter.

The other two Oklahoma officers with ties to this area were killed during much different times — in 1895 and 1926.

Pottawatomie County Sheriff Mike Booth said the Oklahoma Law Enforcement Memorial staff has worked to gather information about the local deputies for the state and national memorials.

“They gave their lives to protect their community and citizens,” Booth said, adding it's important to make sure that sacrifice isn't forgotten.

Pottawatomie County Deputy Sheriff Will Turner was shot and killed by Bob Christian, one of the notorious Christian brothers, and three of his friends on April 27, 1895, as Turner attempted to arrest Christian on a warrant for grand larceny.

Deputy Turner had located Christian near the town of Violet Springs, which at that time was one of the toughest, most lawless border towns in the Oklahoma Territory. Christian was with three other men when Deputy Turner single-handedly confronted all four men in an attempt to serve his warrant.

Oklahoma Law Enforcement Memorial Records show Christian told Turner to keep his warrant and then drew his gun.

Deputy Turner was able to fire first and hit Christian in the chest. It did not injure Christian, but knocked him to the ground, as it was discovered he was wearing a steel vest plate.

All four men opened fire on the deputy, killing him. All four men were soon tracked down and arrested. One was acquitted and one received two years, while William “Bill” Christian received five years and Robert “Bob” Christian received a 10-year sentence.

Bob and Bill Christian were still in the Oklahoma County jail appealing their cases on June 30, 1895, when they escaped with James Casey, killing Oklahoma City Police Chief John Milton Jones in the process. James Casey was killed in the escape and Bill Christian escaped but was later killed in 1897 by a posses in Arizona. Bob Christian escaped and was never located.

 

Pottawatomie County Deputy Sheriff James R. Lindsey was accidentally shot and killed November 14, 1926.

Lindsey, 42, was trailing some armed robbers when he stopped in Meeker in Lincoln County to solicit help in his search from Lincoln County Deputy Dan M. Fuller.

Fuller advised that the two men had tried to rob him as well and was demonstrating how he drew his gun on the men when the hammer of Fuller's gun caught on his keychain and caused the gun to fire. The bullet struck Deputy Lindsey in the head and he died soon afterwards. He left behind his wife and three children and Deputy Fuller was charged with manslaughter, according to records from the Oklahoma Law Enforcement Memorial.

Booth said their names will now be forever etched on the National memorial.

 

The other six Oklahoma officers being added to the wall in 2016 are:

• Osage County Deputy Sheriff James E. Fields who died April 14, 1961, of a heart attack after struggling with a man he was arresting;

• Officer Allen P. Trentham of the Hobart Police Department was shot July 27, 1930, attempting to make an arrest of a drunk man and died from his wound the next day;

• Special Agent for the St. Louis & San Frisco Railroad Police Samuel E. Adair was killed May 3,1922, when he was accidentally struck by a train in the Tulsa yards;

• Special Agent for the St. Louis & San Frisco Railroad Police Charles E. Chitwood was shot and killed as he attempted to arrest a man he caught burglarizing a box car on July 26, 1920;

• Special Agent for the St. Louis & San Frisco Railroad Police Boss Huffman was killed March 12, 1918, when his foot got stuck in the tracks as a switch engine was backing down the tracks and struck him;

• Bennington City Marshal James E. Parish was shot and killed July 23, 1912, by the sons of a man Parish had just confiscated some cattle from in a civil suit;

For more information on these officers and the other almost eight hundred officers who have died in the line of duty in Oklahoma, both before and after statehood, go to the Oklahoma Law Enforcement Memorial web site at www.oklemem.com.