The classic movie that spawned three remakes and provided the basis for the longest running show on Broadway will make its first public appearance in Shawnee in some 90-plus years.

The classic movie that spawned three remakes and provided the basis for the longest running show on Broadway will make its first public appearance in Shawnee in some 90-plus years.

Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 501 N. Broadway, will host a free public showing of the original 1925 silent movie version of “The Phantom of the Opera” in the church sanctuary at 6:30 p.m. on Halloween night, Oct. 31.

Live pipe organ and piano music by church organist and Director of Music Ron Lewis, assisted by his wife, Jo Lewis, will accompany the film. A former Oklahoma Baptist University professor of piano for 36 years, Lewis and his wife will be supplying classical selections from Bach as well as various operas to set the correct mood for the story. Mrs. Lewis is currently the piano preparatory teacher at OBU.

Based on Gaston Leroux’s 1910 novel, the movie stars Lon Chaney in the role of the deformed Phantom, who haunts the Paris Opera House causing fear and mayhem in an attempt to make the woman he “loves” a star. The film remains most famous for Chaney’s ghastly, self-devised makeup, which was kept a studio secret until the film’s premiere.

Chaney’s expertise in creating theatrical makeup and grotesque characters led him to be nicknamed “The Man of 1000 Faces.” He is regarded as one of the most versatile and powerful actors of early cinema, renowned for his characterizations of tortured and afflicted characters, and his groundbreaking artistry with makeup.

Producer Carl Laemmle of Universal Pictures had the Paris Opera House constructed on Stage 28 at the studio in 1923. To accommodate the thousands of extra, the set was created with steel girders set in concrete — the first time for a motion picture set. It remained on the studio lot until 2014 when Stage 28 was demolished. However, the Paris Opera House set was preserved.

Although not an immediate success in its first test screenings, “Phantom of the Opera” is regarded as a classic in spectacle and terror from the silent movie era. The famous “unmasking scene” left audiences of the day screaming when the skull-like face of the Phantom was revealed.

The event will provide modern audiences a look at an acclaimed classic with live accompaniment as it was originally intended to have.

The church will be open at 6 p.m. for arrival and seating.