Voters will go to the polls Tuesday to cast their ballots in the Nov. 6 general election. Statewide, voters will decides many races, including Governor as well as the fate of five state questions.

There are several local races for area voters as well. In Pottawatomie and Lincoln Counties, voters will elect a new district attorney. Candidates in that race are First Assistant District Attorney Adam Panter, a Democrat, and Attorney Allan Grubb, running as a Republican.

Voters will decide between Tracy McDaniel and Kelli McCullar for associate district judge, and the District 26 Houses of Representative race is on the ballot for Shawnee area voters.

In District 26, voters will decide between Incumbent Dell Kerbs, a Republican, and Democrat Terry Hopkins.

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Anyone who needs to look up their polling place, verify their registration information, or view a sample ballot can do so online. The Online Voter Tool can be accessed on the Oklahoma State Election Board’s website: www.elections.ok.gov.

ELECTION DAY VOTING; EXPECT LINES

Polls are open statewide from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 6.

KNOW YOUR POLLING PLACE

Before going to vote, confirm your polling location. Look at your voter ID card, use the election board’s Online Voter Tool at www.elections.ok.gov or call your county election board.

Look at your sample ballot using the Online Voter Tool. The law allows you to bring notes or a marked sample ballot with you to the polls as long as you do not show them to anyone else in the polling location. Bringing notes will help you cast your ballot faster and keep lines and wait times down.

KNOW THE LAW

Electioneering within 300 feet of a ballot box is a misdemeanor. Electioneering includes the wearing of campaign buttons, t-shirts or other paraphernalia and advocating for candidates, parties or ballot issues either orally or with written materials.

PROOF OF IDENTITY

There are three ways for voters to prove their identity under state law: Show a valid photo ID issued by the federal, state, or tribal government; or show the free voter ID card; or sign an affidavit and vote a provisional ballot.