This week and next, Mabel Bassett Correctional Center (MBCC) officers are delivering a message to area school districts from the inmates — that though they may not have easy access to a lot of resources, they are willing to do what they can to help; and they are putting their money where their mouths are.

This week and next, Mabel Bassett Correctional Center (MBCC) officers are delivering a message to area school districts from the inmates — that though they may not have easy access to a lot of resources, they are willing to do what they can to help; and they are putting their money where their mouths are.

In the spring, when Oklahoma encountered teacher walkouts due to a lack of adequate education funding, the women incarcerated at MBCC decided to do something to help.

Cory Ketch, warden’s assistant at MBCC, said the inmate population took notice of the struggle the education department was/is having with funding,

so they met with the inmate council to do a fundraiser to try and help the local schools as much as they could.

“The inmates at MBCC were able to raise $3,000,” Ketch said, “and have split that money between four different schools here in Pottawatomie County.”

Each of the four rural schools are receiving a check for $750, he said.

On Monday, Maud Elementary received their $750 check.

The MBCC officers went to Earlsboro Elementary School Tuesday to present the administration with the funds.

Next Thursday, Dec. 20, McLoud Elementary will receive its money from MBCC.

Ketch said he is still waiting on confirmation from Asher Public Schools to set a date for presentation of its check.