Ceremony, political jibes mark Trump's first day in London

LONDON (AP) — Mixing pageantry and pugilism, President Donald Trump plunged into his long-delayed state visit to Britain on Monday, welcomed with smiles and a cannon salute by the royals but launching political insults at others in a time of turmoil for both nations in the deep, if recently strained, alliance.

It was a whirlwind of pomp, circumstance and protest for Trump, who had lunch with Queen Elizabeth and tea with Prince Charles before a grand state dinner at Buckingham Palace.

The queen used her toast to emphasize the importance of international institutions created by Britain, the United States and other allies after World War II, a subtle rebuttal to Trump, a critic of NATO and the U.N.

But most of the talk and the colorful images were just what the White House wanted to showcase Trump as a statesman while, back home, the race to succeed him — and talk of impeaching him — heated up. Yet Trump, forever a counter-puncher, immediately roiled diplomatic docility by tearing into London Mayor Sadiq Khan.

The agenda for Trump's weeklong European journey is mostly ceremonial:

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Gunman's resignation email gave no hint of bloodshed to come

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (AP) — The Virginia Beach employee who shot and killed 12 people at a municipal building gave no hint of the bloodbath to come when he emailed his resignation letter earlier in the day, saying that he was leaving for "personal reasons" but that "it has been a pleasure to serve."

The two-sentence email from DeWayne Craddock, an engineer with the city utilities department, was released Monday.

Craddock, 40, opened fire on his co-workers on Friday, then was killed in a gunbattle with police, leaving no immediate clues to what set him off.

The email read: "I want to officially put in my (2) weeks' notice to vacant my position of Engineer III with the City of Virginia Beach. It has been a pleasure to serve the City, but due to personal reasons I must relieve my position."

An unidentified person responded to the email by saying he or she hoped that Craddock would be able to resolve his personal issues and that Craddock's last day would be Friday, June 14. Craddock responded: "Thank you. Yes, that is correct."

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APNewsBreak: Ex-governor's phone seized in Flint water probe

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Authorities investigating Flint's water crisis have used search warrants to seize from storage the state-owned mobile devices of former Gov. Rick Snyder and 65 other current or former officials, The Associated Press has learned.

The warrants were sought two weeks ago by the attorney general's office and signed by a Flint judge, according to documents the AP obtained through public records requests.

Solicitor General Fadwa Hammoud and Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy, who is helping with the probe, confirmed they executed a series of search warrants related to the criminal investigation of Flint's lead-contaminated water in 2014-15 and a deadly outbreak of Legionnaires' disease.

The water crisis in Flint was one of the worst man-made environmental disasters in U.S. history. Untreated water leached lead from pipes and into Flint's homes and businesses while cost-cutting financial managers — appointed by Snyder — were running the city.

The investigation has led to charges against 15 current or former government officials, including two who served in the Cabinet of Snyder, a Republican who left office in December. But no one is behind bars, and some Flint residents believe key players who could have prevented the lead debacle are getting off easy.

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US, Mexico officials to begin talks over tariffs, border

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mexico launched a counteroffensive Monday against the threat of U.S. tariffs, warning not only that it would hurt the economies of both countries but also could cause a quarter-million more Central Americans to migrate North.

A high-level delegation from the Mexican government held a press conference at the embassy in Washington, making the case against the threat by President Donald Trump of imposing a 5% tariff on Mexican imports by June 10.

It is unclear what more Mexico can do — and what will be enough — to satisfy the president.

"As a sign of good faith, Mexico should immediately stop the flow of people and drugs through their country and to our Southern Border. They can do it if they want!" Trump tweeted Monday from London.

Trump's Republican allies warn that tariffs on Mexican imports will hit U.S. consumers and harm the economy.

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Sudan troops move to crush pro-democracy camp, killing 30

KHARTOUM, Sudan (AP) — Sudan's ruling military moved to crush the protest movement opposing its grip on power as security forces overran the main sit-in site in the capital early Monday, unleashing furious volleys of gunfire, burning down tents and killing at least 30 people, witnesses and protest leaders said.

With the assault, the generals signaled an end of their tolerance of the pro-democracy demonstrators, who for months have been camped outside the military's headquarters as the two sides negotiated over who would run the country after the April ouster of longtime strongman Omar al-Bashir.

After they succeeded in forcing the military to remove al-Bashir, the protesters had stayed in the streets, demanding the generals move to the background and allow civilians to lead the transition.

The dispersal of the sit-in now risks escalating violence even further. Scattered by the bloody assault, protesters vowed to keep up their campaign, suspending talks and calling for a general strike and civil disobedience. They urged nighttime marches across the country.

"This is a critical point in our revolution. The military council has chosen escalation and confrontation," said Mohammed Yousef al-Mustafa, a spokesman for the Sudanese Professionals' Association, which has spearheaded the protests.

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Congress finally to send $19B disaster aid bill to Trump

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is finally shipping President Donald Trump a $19.1 billion disaster aid bill, a measure stalled for months by infighting, misjudgment, and a presidential feud with Democrats.

The House is approving the measure in its first significant action as it returns from a 10-day recess. It is slated for a Monday evening vote in which Republicans whose home districts have been hit by hurricanes, floods, tornadoes and fires are set to join with majority Democrats to deliver a big vote for the measure.

Conservative Republicans had held up the bill during the recess, objecting on three occasions to efforts by Democratic leaders to pass the bill by a voice vote requiring unanimity. They say the legislation — which reflects an increasingly permissive attitude in Washington on spending to address disasters that sooner or later hit every region of the country — shouldn't be rushed through without a recorded vote.

Along the way, House and Senate old-timers have seemed to outmaneuver the White House, though Trump personally prevailed upon Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., to drop a bid to free up billions of dollars for dredging and other harbor projects. The Senate passed the bill by a sweeping 85-8 vote on its way out of Washington May 23, a margin that reflected a consensus that the bill is long overdue.

The measure was initially held up over a fight between Trump and Democrats over aid to Puerto Rico that seems long settled.

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Long list of troubled nursing homes revealed by senators

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government for years has kept under wraps the names of hundreds of nursing homes around the country found by inspectors to have serious ongoing health, safety or sanitary problems.

Nearly 400 facilities nationwide had a "persistent record of poor care" as of April, but they were not included along with a shorter list of homes that get increased federal scrutiny and do have warning labels, according to a Senate report released Monday.

Budget cuts appear to be contributing to the problem by reducing money available for the focused inspections that are required for nursing homes on the shorter list, according to documents and interviews.

The secrecy undermines the federal commitment to ensure transparency for families struggling to find nursing homes for loved ones and raises questions about why the names of some homes are not disclosed while others are publicly identified, according to two senators who released the report on Monday.

"We've got to make sure any family member or any potential resident of a nursing home can get this information, not only ahead of time but on an ongoing basis," said Sen. Bob Casey, D-Pa., who along with Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., issued the report .

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Mutation that protects against HIV raises death rate

NEW YORK (AP) — People with a DNA mutation that reduces their chance of HIV infection may die sooner, according to a study that suggests tinkering with a gene to try to fix one problem may cause others.

The study authors cited the case of the Chinese researcher who tried to produce this mutation in twin girls before their birth, to reduce their risk for HIV. His work, which produced the first gene-edited babies, was widely condemned as unethical and risky, and the new paper illustrates one reason for concern.

"You should consider all the effects of mutations you induce," said Rasmus Nielsen of the University of California, Berkeley, senior author of the paper , released Monday by the journal Nature Medicine.

Nielsen acknowledged that his result cannot be applied directly to the two girls in China. For one thing, his study focused on a sample of people in the United Kingdom who may have different genetic backgrounds than the Chinese girls.

In addition, the people he studied had inherited a specific mutation. The Chinese scientist tried to create the same mutation, but failed. The girls now carry different alterations in the same gene.

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High court will hear copyright dispute involving pirate ship

WASHINGTON (AP) — A dispute involving the pirate Blackbeard's sunken ship is on deck for the Supreme Court's next term.

The justices said Monday they will hear arguments in the fall in a copyright case involving the Queen Anne's Revenge, which was discovered off North Carolina's coast in 1996. The case pits the state of North Carolina against a company that has documented the ship's recovery.

The ship is the property of the state, but under an agreement, North Carolina-based Nautilus Productions has for nearly two decades documented the ship's salvage. In the process, the company and copyrighted photos and videos of the ship.

In 2013, the state and Nautilus resolved one copyright dispute over photos the state posted on the website of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, which oversees the ship's recovery and preservation.

The sides reached a settlement agreement in which neither side admitted wrongdoing. But Nautilus later sued after the state posted a handful of Nautilus videos on a state YouTube channel and used a photo in a newsletter. In 2015, state lawmakers passed a law that made shipwreck videos and photographs in the state's custody public records. In its lawsuit, Nautilus argued the law should be declared unconstitutional.

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IAAF ordered by court to suspend Semenya testosterone rules

Caster Semenya won an interim ruling in her battle against the IAAF when the Swiss supreme court ordered athletics' governing body to suspend its testosterone regulations on Monday, raising the prospect of her competing at the world championships without having to take hormone suppressing medication.

The decision temporarily lifts the contentious rules, at least until the IAAF responds with arguments to the supreme court, known as the Swiss Federal Tribunal, to restore them. The IAAF has until June 25 to do that.

Should the IAAF fail to overturn the ruling, the regulations will remain suspended until Semenya's full appeal is heard by a panel of Swiss federal judges. That could take up to a year or more, meaning the 28-year-old South African might be cleared to run unrestricted in her favored event in remaining Diamond League meetings and the worlds in Doha, Qatar, in September and October.

"I am thankful to the Swiss judges for this decision," Semenya said. "I hope that following my appeal I will once again be able to run free."

The supreme court appeal is the second time the two-time Olympic 800-meter champion has challenged the IAAF rules. Semenya lost her case against the IAAF at the Court of Arbitration for Sport on May 1 and the rules came into effect on May 8.