Oklahoma governor, GOP leaders: drug settlement violates law

NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Oklahoma's governor and Republican legislative leaders are raising concerns about the state's proposed $85 million settlement with an opioid manufacturer that has yet to be approved by a judge.

Gov. Kevin Stitt, House Speaker Charles McCall and Senate President Pro Tem Greg Treat say in a brief filed Friday that the proposed settlement doesn't comply with a new state law .

Attorney General Mike Hunter announced the deal with Israeli-owned Teva Pharmaceuticals on May 26.

The three leaders say they believe the settlement conflicts with the law that directs any settlement funds directly into the state treasury. The law was passed last month after lawmakers openly grumbled about how Hunter structured the state's $270 million settlement with Purdue Pharmaceuticals.

Oklahoma's lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson over the opioid epidemic is continuing.

Police video shows man falling from Tulsa bridge after chase

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Video from a police body camera shows a shooting suspect falling about 30 feet (9 meters) from an Oklahoma bridge as he fled from officers.

A Tulsa police news release says officers responding to reports of someone shooting at a motorist from a car on April 30 followed the vehicle onto Interstate 244. The vehicle crashed into a barrier.

Police say Damico Taylor of Sand Springs ran from the car to the wall and climbed over.

The video released Thursday shows Taylor hanging from the wall until he either releases or loses his grip. The unidentified officer ran to the concrete ditch, where Taylor said "everything" hurts.

Police said in the news release that Taylor fractured his skull. Police didn't return phone calls Friday. Online court records don't list any charges against him.

Oklahoma's governor picks interim head of corrections

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt has named the Oklahoma Department of Corrections' operations chief as interim director of the agency.

Stitt announced Scott Crow has the job Friday following the sudden resignation Joe Allbaugh, who quit as director Wednesday.

Crow joined the department in 1996 as a special investigator supervisor. He previously worked as a law enforcement officer, including as a sheriff's captain in Comanche County and as assistant police chief in Cache.

The DOC is the state's second largest agency with more than 4,300 employees and 26,145 inmates as of Thursday. More than 32,000 people are under DOC community supervision and about 730 inmates are being held in county jails statewide pending transfer to the state prison system.

Families of missing indigenous women march in Oklahoma

CONCHO, Okla. (AP) — Families and friends of missing or slain American Indian women and girls are again calling for justice for their loved ones.

About 200 people gathered Friday near the headquarters of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in Concho, Oklahoma. Many wore red and marched, holding signs with pictures of women on them.

Similar demonstrations have taken place in other states amid growing concern that police nationwide are not adequately identifying or reporting cases of missing and murdered Native American and Alaska Native women and girls. Those demographic groups have some of the nation's highest rates of sexual and domestic violence .

Kateri Fletcher is a Cheyenne and Arapaho tribal government official who helped organize the event. She said it was designed to bring awareness and show support for families who still need answers.