Iran speeds up uranium enrichment as Mideast tensions mount

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran will surpass the uranium-stockpile limit set by its nuclear deal in the next 10 days, an official said Monday, raising pressure on Europeans trying to save the accord a year after the U.S. withdrawal lit the fuse for the heightened tensions now between Tehran and Washington.

The announcement by Iran's nuclear agency marked yet another deadline set by Tehran. President Hassan Rouhani already has warned Europe that a new deal needs to be in place by July 7 or the Islamic Republic would increase its enrichment of uranium.

Atomic energy spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi suggested that Iran's enrichment could reach up to 20%, just a step away from weapons-grade levels.

It appears as if Iran has begun its own maximum pressure campaign on the world after facing one from President Donald Trump's administration that deeply cut into its sale of crude oil abroad and sent its economy into freefall. Europe has so far been unable to offer Iran a way around the U.S. sanctions.

The development follows apparent attacks last week in the Strait of Hormuz on oil tankers, assaults that Washington has blamed on Iran. While Iran has denied being involved, it laid mines in the 1980s targeting oil tankers around the narrow mouth of the Persian Gulf through which a fifth of the world's crude oil passes.

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US restores some aid but vows no more without migrant action

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said Monday it is easing previously announced cuts in hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to the Central American nations of El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala but will not allow new funding until those countries do more to reduce migrant flows to the United States.

The State Department said that after a review of more than $615 million in assistance that President Donald Trump ordered in March to be cut entirely, it would go ahead with $432 million in projects and grants that had been previously approved. The remaining amount will be held in escrow pending consultations with Congress, it said.

That $432 million, which comes from the 2017 budget, is being spent on health, education and poverty alleviation programs as well as anti-crime efforts that many believe help reduce migrant outflows from the impoverished Northern Triangle region. About $370 million in money from the 2018 budget will not be spent and instead will be moved to other projects, the State Department said.

"Previously awarded grants and contracts will continue with current funding," department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus said. She added that assistance "to help the Northern Triangle governments take actions that will protect the U.S. border and counter transnational organized crime will also continue."

U.S. officials said the review looked at roughly 700 projects funded with fiscal 2017 money by the United States in the three countries and concluded that a significant number were too far advanced to end them.

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Egypt's ousted president Morsi dies in court during trial

CAIRO (AP) — Egypt's first democratically elected president, Islamist leader Mohammed Morsi, who was ousted by the military in 2013 after a year in office, collapsed in court while on trial Monday and died, state TV and his family said.

The 67-year-old Morsi had just addressed the court, speaking from the glass cage he is kept in during sessions and warning that he had "many secrets" he could reveal, a judicial official said. A few minutes afterward, he collapsed in the cage, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to the press.

In his final comments, he continued to insist he was Egypt's legitimate president, demanding a special tribunal, one of his defense lawyers, Kamel Madour told the Associated Press. State TV said Morsi died before he could be taken to the hospital.

Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood accused the government of "assassinating" him through years of poor prison conditions. Morsi, who was known to have diabetes, had been imprisoned since his 2013 ouster, often in solitary confinement and barred from visitors — his family was allowed to visit only three times during that time. Egypt's chief prosecutor said Morsi's body would be examined to determine the cause of his death.

It was a dramatic end for a figure who was central in the twists and turns taken by Egypt since its "revolution" — from the pro-democracy uprising that in 2011 ousted the country's longtime authoritarian leader, Hosni Mubarak, through controversial Islamist rule and now back to a tight grip under the domination of military men.

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Gloria Vanderbilt, heiress, jeans queen, dies at 95

NEW YORK (AP) — Gloria Vanderbilt, the intrepid heiress, artist and romantic who began her extraordinary life as the "poor little rich girl" of the Great Depression, survived family tragedy and multiple marriages and reigned during the 1970s and '80s as a designer jeans pioneer, died Monday at the age of 95.

Vanderbilt was the great-great-granddaughter of financier Cornelius Vanderbilt and the mother of CNN newsman Anderson Cooper, who announced her death via a first-person obituary that aired on the network Monday morning.

Cooper said Vanderbilt died at home with friends and family at her side. She had been suffering from advanced stomach cancer, he noted.

"Gloria Vanderbilt was an extraordinary woman, who loved life, and lived it on her own terms," Cooper said in a statement. "She was a painter, a writer, and designer but also a remarkable mother, wife, and friend. She was 95 years old, but ask anyone close to her, and they'd tell you, she was the youngest person they knew, the coolest, and most modern."

Her life was chronicled in sensational headlines from her childhood through four marriages and three divorces. She married for the first time at 17, causing her aunt to disinherit her. Her husbands included Leopold Stokowski, the celebrated conductor, and Sidney Lumet, the award-winning movie and television director. In 1988, she witnessed the suicide of one of her four sons.

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Buttigieg goes home to South Bend after man killed by police

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg is canceling several days of campaign events following the fatal shooting of a black man by a police officer in the Indiana town where he serves as mayor.

Eric Jack Logan, 54, was killed in South Bend early Sunday after someone called police to report a suspicious person going through cars, according to the St. Joseph County prosecutor's office. A police officer confronted a man in a vehicle at an apartment building parking lot. The man, later identified as Logan, got out of the vehicle and approached the officer with a knife raised, and the officer opened fire, the prosecutor's office said. He died at a hospital.

Authorities didn't release the name or race of the officer. An autopsy was scheduled for Monday.

The shooting presents both political peril for a presidential candidate who's struggled to connect with minority voters and an opportunity to show leadership on issues of race and policing that are critical — and personal — for much of the Democratic primary electorate. In a matter of months, Buttigieg has gone from a relatively obscure 37-year-old mayor to the top tier of a crowded Democratic presidential field. His handling of the shooting could test his ability to navigate the demands of the campaign trail while still performing his day job.

"I did consider it important to be here to have these conversations," Buttigieg said in South Bend on Sunday after cutting short a presidential campaign trip. "I know that whenever an incident like this happens, there is tremendous hurt that can come about. That the city will be hurting."

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Masked gunman killed after shootout at Dallas courthouse

DALLAS (AP) — A masked gunman opened fire Monday on a federal courthouse in downtown Dallas before being fatally shot in an exchange of gunfire with federal officers, witnesses and authorities said.

Brian Isaack Clyde, 22, was pronounced dead at a hospital following the shooting outside the Earle Cabell Federal Building. Authorities offered no hint of his motive, but FBI agent Matthew DeSarno said there was nothing to indicate the presence of any other shooters or threats to the city.

Clyde opened fire about 8:40 a.m., and law enforcement immediately responded, including three officers from the Federal Protective Service who were stationed at the building.

A bomb squad later examined a vehicle associated with the gunman as a precaution and performed controlled explosions, authorities said. Two loud blasts could be heard.

The Dallas Morning News reported that one of its photographers, Tom Fox, was outside the building and witnessed the shooter opening fire. Fox said the masked man parked at a street corner, then ran and began shooting at the courthouse. The bullets shattered the glass panes in a revolving door.

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Blackout in South America raises questions about power grid

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — The huge blackout that left tens of millions of people in the dark in Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay over the weekend raised serious questions about the vulnerability of the power grid in South America and brought criticism down on Argentina's leader.

President Mauricio Macri promised a thorough investigation into the cause of what he called an unprecedented outage. Energy officials said the findings would not be available for 10 to 15 days, and they had no immediate estimate of the economic damage from Sunday's 14-hour power failure.

"This is an extraordinary event that should have never happened," said Argentine Energy Secretary Gustavo Lopetegui. "It's very serious. We can't leave the whole country all of a sudden without electricity."

He vowed: "There is zero chance that this will repeat itself. It can't repeat itself."

While the precise cause has yet to be established, the blackout originated at a transmission point between two power stations in the country's northeast "when the system was getting too much power," Lopetegui said. A chain of events then caused a total disruption, he said.

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Harvard pulls Parkland grad's admission over racist comments

BOSTON (AP) — A Parkland school shooting survivor says Harvard University revoked his acceptance over racist comments he made in a shared Google Doc and in text messages about two years ago.

Kyle Kashuv says the Ivy League school asked him in May to explain the comments he made months before the February 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. He apologized for his private comments that had surfaced online. He says he told Harvard officials the comments were "idiotic and hurtful" but don't represent who he is now.

In a June 3 letter that Kashuv shared online Monday, Harvard said it had rescinded his admission because of his comments.

A spokeswoman says the school does not comment on admissions decisions.

Kashuv has advocated for gun rights since a former Parkland student killed 17 people.

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Scientists take a peek behind those sad puppy dog eyes

NEW YORK (AP) — What's behind those hard-to-resist puppy dog eyes?

New research suggests that over thousands of years of dog domestication, people preferred pups that could pull off that appealing, sad look. And that encouraged the development of the facial muscle that creates it.

Today, pooches use the muscle to raise their eyebrows and make the babylike expression. That muscle is virtually absent in their ancestors, the wolves.

"You don't typically see such muscle differences in species that are that closely related," said Anne Burrows of Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, an author of the study released Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Dogs differ from wolves in many ways, from having shorter snouts, smaller sizes and more expressive faces. And unlike wolves, dogs heavily rely on human eye contact, whether to know when someone's talking to them or when they can't solve a problem, like hopping a fence or getting out the door.

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2 shot, 2 arrested at Raptors rally; celebration continues

TORONTO (AP) — Two people were shot and wounded at a rally Monday for the NBA champion Raptors, and two people were arrested, police said.

Droves of Raptors fans ran from the shooting in a stampede from the City Hall square, which was packed with tens of thousands of fans. A million or more fans earlier packed downtown Toronto for a parade for the Raptors, raising concerns about safety and overcrowding.

Toronto police spokeswoman Allison Sparkes later confirmed two people were shot and two were arrested. Two firearms were recovered.

"We have no incidents currently underway. Crowds are dispersing," Sparkes said.

Asked if it was a targeted shooting or terrorism-related, Sparkes said the investigation was ongoing.