Pottawatomie County residents continue to pick up the pieces after waves of stormy weather have rolled through the area — with yet more rain in the forecast ahead.

Pottawatomie County residents continue to pick up the pieces after waves of stormy weather have rolled through the area — with yet more rain in the forecast ahead.

Shawnee/Pottawatomie County Emergency Management Director Donald D. Lynch said Disaster Survivor Assistance (DSA) squads recently canvassed impacted areas of the county.

“The squads visited 151 homes, had 148 survivor interactions, made 22 connections at public spaces, made 15 private-sector contacts, and interacted with 13 community and faith-based organizations,” he said.

So far, 145 registrations have been recorded, Lynch said.

“We continue to encourage residents/business owners who have encountered structural damage to call the tele-registration hotline 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) and register, even if they think their damage will be covered by insurance,” Lynch said. “Though there will be a deadline for registration.”

By registering now, Lynch said people will already be in the system if they find they have uninsured loss at a future date.

Lynch said Emergency Management volunteers have placed information flyers in commercial establishments in the Shawnee and McLoud areas encouraging residents and business owners to tele-register.

“We intend to cover the remainder of Pottawatomie County next week,” he said.

A joint Federal/State/Local damage assessment was made on Tuesday in Shawnee and Tecumseh.

“We have more than enough damage to satisfy the county threshold of $262,490.76,” Lynch said.

Lynch said Pottawatomie County was not included in a declaration for parts of the state needing public assistance with emergency protective measures and debris removal.

The governor has not yet requested a public assistance declaration, he said.

The Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management continues to work with local communities, private non-profits, electrical cooperatives, and others to identify and quantify the public sector damage across the state.

As of Friday no critical or new emerging issues had been identified, he said. But residents should continue to be weather aware.

Debris removal

When removing debris from a residence after a storm, Lynch said not everything should be simply tossed into a poly cart; certain items must be handled in a particular way.

Central Disposal removes residential green waste from the curb side every week on the day that residential trash is picked up. A few rules to remember are:

• Limbs must be no bigger than three inches in diameter and must be cut into sections no longer than three or four feet and bundled together.

• Green waste has to be at the curb by 7 a.m. on trash pick-up day.

• Do not put any limbs in the poly carts because it makes it unsafe and sometimes the poly carts cannot be dumped because the limbs interfere with the collection process.