Giuliani faces subpoena for documents in impeachment probe

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats subpoenaed President Donald Trump's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, for documents on Monday as they ramped up investigations of the president's dealings with Ukraine.

The House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight and Reform panels announced the subpoena as they examine Trump's efforts to have Ukraine investigate political rival Joe Biden and his family. Giuliani assisted in that effort.

The committees are investigating the matter, the subject of a now-public whistleblower's complaint, as part of an impeachment inquiry endorsed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi last week. They are moving rapidly with a goal of finishing the inquiry, and perhaps even voting on articles of impeachment, by year's end.

Both Trump and Giuliani have acknowledged the efforts to influence Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to investigate Hunter Biden's membership on the board of a Ukrainian gas company at the same time his father was leading the Obama administration's diplomatic dealings with Kyiv. There has been no evidence of wrongdoing by either of the Bidens.

The chairmen of the three committees noted that Giuliani has acknowledged his efforts to pressure Ukrainian officials on national television.

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What's next as House committees launch impeachment probes

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are planning a rapid start to their push for impeachment of President Donald Trump, with hearings and depositions starting this week.

Democratic leaders have instructed committees to move quickly — and not to lose momentum — after revelations that Trump asked Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to investigate his potential 2020 Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, and his family. The action is beginning even though lawmakers left town Friday for a two-week recess.

The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., says his committee is moving "expeditiously" on hearings and subpoenas. That committee, as well as the House Oversight and Reform Committee and the House Foreign Affairs Committee, have scheduled depositions starting this week for State Department officials linked to Trump's dealings with Ukraine.

A look at next steps as Democrats march toward an impeachment vote:

A BUSY RECESS

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California to let college athletes sign endorsement deals

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Defying the NCAA, California opened the way Monday for college athletes to hire agents and make money from endorsement deals with sneaker companies, soft drink makers, car dealerships and other sponsors, just like the pros.

The first-in-the-nation law, signed by Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom and set to take effect in 2023, could upend amateur sports in the U.S. and trigger a legal challenge.

Newsom and others cast it as an attempt to bring more fairness to big-money college athletics and let players share in the wealth they create for their schools. Critics have long complained that universities are getting rich off the backs of athletes — often, black athletes struggling to get by financially.

"Other college students with a talent, whether it be literature, music, or technological innovation, can monetize their skill and hard work," the governor said. "Student athletes, however, are prohibited from being compensated while their respective colleges and universities make millions, often at great risk to athletes' health, academics and professional careers."

Newsom predicted other states will introduce similar legislation.

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Collins resigns from Congress ahead of expected guilty plea

NEW YORK (AP) — Rep. Chris Collins, a Republican from western New York, submitted his resignation from Congress on Monday ahead of an expected guilty plea in an insider trading case in which he was accused of leaking confidential information during an urgent phone call made from a White House picnic.

Collins' resignation will take effect when Congress meets in a brief session on Tuesday, according to a spokesman for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

A federal judge in Manhattan scheduled a hearing for Collins to enter a guilty plea to unspecified charges in the case Tuesday afternoon. A similar hearing has been scheduled Thursday for the congressman's son, Cameron Collins.

Collins' congressional office declined to comment on Monday. His attorney didn't immediately respond to a message. The U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan also declined to comment.

Collins, who was among the first members of Congress to support President Donald Trump's run for the White House, had been scheduled to go to trial next year on charges of conspiracy, securities fraud, wire fraud and making false statements to the FBI. Prosecutors accused him of sharing non-public information from a biopharmaceutical company with his son, allowing Cameron Collins and another man to avoid nearly $800,000 in stock losses.

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Forever 21 bankruptcy reflects teens' new shopping behavior

NEW YORK (AP) — For years, teens flocked to Forever 21's massive stores at the nation's malls for its speedy take on fashion, like its $5 shimmery halter tops and $25 dresses.

But the chain that helped popularize so-called fast fashion has moved too slow for a new generation of young customers.

The Los Angeles-based privately held chain filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Sunday, a victim of rapidly changing shopping tastes among teens who are increasingly turning away from malls and heading to trendy online sites.

They're also interested in buying eco-friendly fashions, like pants made from recycled plastic, not stuff they'll just throw away after a few uses. And they're gravitating toward online second sites where clothes can be used over and over again. In fact, the secondhand fashion business is projected to reach $64 billion by 2028, nearly 1.5 times the size of fast fashion, according to a report by Global Data Retail.

The bankruptcy marks a dramatic fall for the retailer. Forever 21 was founded in 1984 and, along with other fast-fashion chains like H&M and Zara, rode a wave of popularity among young customers that took off in the mid-1990s. It even stole customers from traditional stalwarts like Abercrombie & Fitch and American Eagle.

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Afghanistan to Taliban: Peace or 'we will continue to fight'

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — As Afghans await the results of a presidential election roiled by Taliban threats, the government used its platform at the U.N. General Assembly on Monday to tell the insurgents: "Join us in peace, or we will continue to fight."

Afghanistan was not the only country sending a message: North Korea had one for the United States , saying it was up to Washington whether now-stalled nuclear negotiations "become a window of opportunity or an occasion that will hasten the crisis."

And even in the final hour of this year's U.N. gathering of world leaders, Iran and Saudi Arabia traded barbs sharpened by a recent missile and drone strike on major Saudi oil facilities.

Monday's speeches wrapped up a meeting marked by global worries over the rising tensions in the Persian Gulf region , the changing climate and the very future of the idea of large-scale international cooperation that the U.N. represents.

As General Assembly President Tijjani Muhammad-Bande put it in his closing remarks, "The world will not survive for long unless we cultivate the give-and-take spirit" of multilateralism.

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Happy now? Everyone is talking about 'Joker'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — There may be no such thing as bad publicity, but the spotlight on "Joker" is testing the limits of that old cliche.

The origin story about the classic Batman villain has inspired pieces both in defense of and against the movie. It's been hailed as the thing that's going to finally get Joaquin Phoenix an Oscar and also decried for being "dangerous," ''irresponsible" and even "incel-friendly." Last week, some parents of victims of the 2012 Aurora movie theater shooting even wrote to the Warner Bros. CEO asking for support for anti-gun causes. The studio issued a statement in response saying that the film is not "an endorsement of real-world violence of any kind."

In his 80 years as part of the culture, the Joker has always had a way of getting under people's skin — whether it's because of who the character appeals to, what he represents or even the stories actors tell about how they got into character. But perhaps the biggest irony of all this time around is that for all the discourse and hand-wringing, the film has yet to even open in theaters. That doesn't happen until Thursday night.

It's made for a complicated release for the high-profile film, which got off to a triumphant start premiering at and then winning the top award from the Venice Film Festival. And while reviews are mostly positive, it's also been heavily scrutinized and put the filmmakers on the defensive. Director and co-writer Todd Phillips doesn't mind the discussion.

"I'll talk about it all day," he said. "I'm not shy about it."

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NFL suspends Raiders' Vontaze Burfict for rest of season

Oakland Raiders linebacker Vontaze Burfict was suspended Monday for the rest of the season for a helmet-to-helmet hit on Indianapolis Colts tight end Jack Doyle that is the most severe punishment in NFL history for an on-field infraction.

Burfict will miss the final 12 games of the season and any playoff games for "repeated violations of unnecessary roughness rules." He has been suspended three times in his career for hits violating the league's player safety rules.

Burfict has the right under the collective bargaining agreement to appeal the punishment in the next three days. He had one of his previous suspensions reduced from five games to three games on an appeal in 2017.

It's that history that led to the most severe punishment the NFL has handed out when it comes to player safety, topping the five games Tennessee's Albert Haynesworth got in 2006 for kicking and stomping on Cowboys center Andre Gurode's face, leading to 30 stitches.

Burfict had served two three-game suspensions already in his career and had been warned about severe punishment for future infractions.

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UK's Johnson denies allegations of patronage, groping

MANCHESTER, England (AP) — U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson battled to fend off allegations of improper patronage and groping a woman as he prepared a final push Monday to fulfill his pledge to lead his country out of the European Union in just over a month — and, he hopes, move British politics beyond its fracture over Europe.

Johnson sought to energize Conservative members and lawmakers — weary after three years of Brexit gridlock — at the party's annual conference, but he was forced to deny a journalist's claim that he had grabbed her thigh at a private lunch two decades ago.

Sunday Times columnist Charlotte Edwardes said the incident took place when she worked at The Spectator, a conservative newsmagazine, while Johnson was its editor.

Asked if the allegation was true, Johnson said: "No."

Edwardes stood by her story, tweeting: "If the prime minister doesn't recollect the incident then clearly I have a better memory than he does."

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Southern Baptists ready to put spotlight on sex-abuse crisis

Entangled in a multifaceted sex-abuse crisis, the Southern Baptist Convention is preparing to host a high-profile conference on the topic that has kindled skepticism even among some of the scheduled speakers.

The three-day Caring Well conference opens Thursday at a resort hotel near Dallas, drawing hundreds of pastors and church officials from the largest Protestant denomination in the U.S. for a program featuring victim advocates, attorneys, therapists and at least 10 survivors of sexual abuse.

Several of those survivors told The Associated Press they had mixed feelings about the conference — hoping it represents a genuine desire for change but concerned it might come across as a public relations exercise.

The first survivor scheduled to speak is Susan Codone, a professor at Mercer University in Macon, Georgia, who says she was abused as a teenager by the youth minister and pastor at her SBC church in Alabama.

She is grateful that SBC leaders now seem to be taking the sex abuse problem seriously, but suggested progress would come faster if the denomination — which espouses male leadership at church and in the home — brought more women into leadership roles.