Arthur M. Richardson, alias R. Robert Scott, 30, alleged member of a midwestern bandit gang, was held on indictment by a federal grand jury in Akron, Ohio. He was suspected as a member of the quartet that robbed the Federal National Bank in Shawnee of $18,000. This suspicion was made public on January 9, by Chief of Police L.A. Brown.

THIRD MEMBER OF BANK GANG APPREHENDED

Arthur M. Richardson, alias R. Robert Scott, 30, alleged member of a midwestern bandit gang, was held on indictment by a federal grand jury in Akron, Ohio. He was suspected as a member of the quartet that robbed the Federal National Bank in Shawnee of $18,000. This suspicion was made public on January 9, by Chief of Police L.A. Brown.

Rumors were that Richardson had admitted taking part in the robbery in the Shawnee heist, and another one in Illinois. He was arrested in Akron by Illinois officers and city police. Although Jimmy Overstreet and Joseph Marshall did not elude their fate, Richardson and a fourth companion did. The fourth member at the time was tagged as Art Roberts, although that name was similar to Richardson.

Richardson confessed that he was a member of gang of 36 organized during the past May to rob banks in the Midwest, and to loot mail trains. Chief Brown said this confession was like what he heard from Overstreet. The combined loot of the gang in securities and cash was over a million dollars.

Helen Cardwell-Marshall was released on January 8, by a court order of Judge L.G. Pitman. This followed the recommendations submitted by Claude Hendon, retiring county attorney, and the new one, Randall Pitman. She was released under the condition that she was to appear in court at any time following a sheriff’s order.

FOURTH YEGG APPREHENDED WITH $500 OF LOOT IN HAND

The final chapter of the Shawnee bank robbery was apparently written. Brice McConnell, alleged member of the midwestern bandit gang and fourth member of the quartet that robbed the Federal National Bank on December 10, was arrested on January 10, in East St. Louis. The arrest of Arthur Richardson the day before completed the quartet.

McConnell was arrested in East St. Louis and had $500 on his person and was the owner of an expensive automobile. It appeared that all the pieces of the event were now in place, but operatives suggested that more information was still to come.

Overstreet was now in prison at McAlester, and what was thought to be a second, Joe Marshall was in a pauper’s grave in Bristow. Helen Cardwell-Marshall and Bobby Livingston-Overstreet were now back in St. Louis, released by local courts.

In the confession of Richardson, who with McConnell separated from Overstreet and Marshall, following division of the loot, admitted taking part in the robbery of the bank in Shawnee, and a bank in Illinois. Richardson was expected to be returned to Shawnee, but McConnell would probably not because of other charges against him in other venues.

TALE OF OVERSTREET GANG TAKES ON ANOTHER TWIST

Arthur Richardson was arrested in Akron, Ohio relating to several banks and postoffice robberies. In his confession to police, Jimmy Overstreet of Shawnee, who was now serving a 25-year sentence in McAlester, was the man who killed James McGuire(Joe Marshall) of Granite City. McGuire’s body was found near Bristow on December 12. Per Richardson’s story, the alleged murder was the outgrowth of a dispute over division of the loot.

A part of the confession, that was made public by secret service operatives, indicted that a deputy sheriff of Madison County, IL, aided a band of eight bandits to escape from federal agents, when East St. Louis detectives raided a house in Granite City. Overstreet had confessed before his sentencing, that he and his confederates were concealed in a secret basement because of the warning received from the deputy that the feds were coming.

Another interesting twist came from back in Oklahoma, concerning the murder of James McGuire; or was it Joseph Marshall, as first thought. Marshall’s wife, Helen Cardwell-Marshall, said that the bandit slain near Bristow was her husband. Police now believed that statement may have been false, according to information released by County Attorney Randall Pitman.

Cardwell-Marshall, who was released from jail on January 8, after being held relating to a filling station robbery and kidnapping on December 7, identified the clothing of the slain bandit as that of her husband’s, Joseph Marshall. She said he went under the alias of James McGuire. However, it proved out that McGuire was the killed bandit’s true name.

The officials learned that Joe Marshall, although a member of the midwestern bandit gang, never came to Oklahoma. It was believed that Helen Cardwell-Marshall, 17, was merely protecting her husband. Termed as an “ignorant” girl by police who impressed interviewers with her sobbing story.

“There was just one man, Joe, and he has been taken away from me,” she said.

Cardwell-Marshall accompanied McGuire to Oklahoma to “spite” her husband. They registered in several Oklahoma hotels as man and wife. When arrested, she had in her possession, a marriage certificate showing that she was legally married to Joe Marshall. Police knew that when she learned that McGuire was killed, she began preparing the false story for the police.

When she identified the clothing of McGuire, she cried, “That man is the father of my unborn baby!” However, it was further revealed that the girl was not an expectant mother.

There were reports that the re-arrest of Cardwell-Marshall and Bobby Livingston-Overstreet, along with an aunt of Jimmy Overstreet’s was eminent.

Warrants were mailed to East St. Louis and Akron, Ohio, from Shawnee on January 10. They charged McConnell and Richardson as participants in the Shawnee robberies. Both men also faced robbery charges in Illinois. It was feared by County Attorney Pitman that they might be able to secure bond and be released in the other states.

(These stories and hundreds more appear in the first volume of Shawnee history, entitled: “REDBUD CITY: SHAWNEE, THE EARLY YEARS, 1830-1929.” It can be purchased by calling Clyde Wooldridge at (918) 470-3728, or by visiting the Pottawatomie County Historical Society at the old Santa Fe Depot. It can be purchased for $35. Volume two, “1930-1949,” is also available for $30. Volume three, “REDBUD CITY: SHAWNEE, THE MIDDLE YEARS, 1950-1969,” is now at the printer’s office and will be ready any day. All three volumes are more than 400 pages with hundreds of photos and illustrations. Volume three is priced at $35. A combination of two or three can be purchased at $30 each. They are fully indexed, making it easy to look up individuals or places of business. Volume four 1970-1989, is scheduled for the fall of 2020; volume five 1990-2009, should be available in the fall of 2021; and volume six 2010-to the present, is scheduled for the fall of 2022. They are also available on thumb drive at the PCHS Museum. Volume Three, 1950-69 in thumb drive is currently available for purchase at Museum.)

Clyde Wooldridge is a local historian.