As part of the city's yearly maintenance program, the water treatment plant is going to perform a two-week return to free chlorine treatment and flush fire hydrants from Dec. 1 to Dec. 15.

As part of the city's yearly maintenance program, the water treatment plant is going to perform a two-week return to free chlorine treatment and flush fire hydrants from Dec. 1 to Dec. 15.

“This is a normal maintenance procedure; during this process your water will continue to be safe to drink,” the city advises.

Routinely, the City of Shawnee uses chloramines that are a disinfectant used to treat drinking water. Chloramines are most commonly formed when ammonia is added to chlorine to treat drinking water. The typical purpose of chloramines is to provide longer-lasting disinfectant properties to the water treatment as the water moves through pipes to consumers. This type of disinfection is known as secondary disinfection. Chloramines have been used by water utilities for almost 90 years, and their use is closely regulated, the city reports.

“More than one in five Americans uses drinking water treated with chloramines,” the press release reads. Water that contains chloramines and meets EPA regulatory standards is safe to use for drinking, cooking, bathing and other household uses.

Using chloramines, a combination of chlorine and ammonia, in the treatment process helps reduce the amount of trihalomethanes. Trihalomethanes are byproducts formed when water is disinfected with chlorine, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

For questions about the change in treatment, call Jacob Wickware at the City of Shawnee Water Treatment Plant at (405) 273-0890.