Bill Lively, who gave his address as “anywhere in Oklahoma,” was held on suspicion by Shawnee police after having been arrested on the morning of July 4, 1925. The event happened near the Country Club, where he was parked by the roadside. A search of his car revealed a large quantity of groceries, tobacco, chewing gum, and other articles of merchandise. It was believed to be stolen from a local grocery store.

OFFICERS HOLDING STORE ROBBERY SUSPECT

Bill Lively, who gave his address as “anywhere in Oklahoma,” was held on suspicion by Shawnee police after having been arrested on the morning of July 4, 1925. The event happened near the Country Club, where he was parked by the roadside. A search of his car revealed a large quantity of groceries, tobacco, chewing gum, and other articles of merchandise. It was believed to be stolen from a local grocery store.

Officers “Boots” Morris and C.J. Bowen arrested Lively. The two officers had been pursuing what they believed to be a “rum” car when they found Lively parked beside the road. When the officers confronted Lively, he attempted to run. He halted only after they threatened to fire.

Morris brought his prisoner to the city and Bowen guarded the car in the belief that Lively might have a companion. Morris stated that he was obliged to use his revolver as a club on his prisoner when Lively attempted to escape while they were driving to the police station.

No robbery report had reached police, but it was pointed out that nearly all places of business did not open Saturday because of the Fourth of July holiday. The robbery may not have been discovered yet. Lively had burglar’s instruments used to open doors and police believed he locked the door behind him to throw off suspicion until the store opened on Monday morning.

Lively was arrested in Shawnee several weeks earlier, when officers caught him loitering about a business house. It was alleged that he attempted to break in. He was held for investigation two or three days and released.

NEW MARSHALL TO BEGIN CLEANUP OF COUNTY

“I believe in the prohibitory law. I am in favor of its enforcement to begin my work by seeing that this law is observed in Pottawatomie County, where things have not been as just as they should be for some time past,” was the pronouncement of Ewers White, newly appointed United States Marshal.

He said this to a gathering of near 300 friends and neighbors, visitors from nearby cities, and representatives of both the major political parties on the spacious lawn of Sunnyside, his country home on the night of July 10.

The gathering was the result of a determination on the part of neighbors and the citizens of McLoud to congratulate their fellow citizen on the successful culmination of his fight for appointment to the high office of marshal. The campaign was for more than a year and in which every method known to the wily politicians and representatives of certain interests had been exhausted. Somehow the word got out that the meeting was to be held and as a result a score or more of automobiles of citizens from Shawnee, Chandler, and Oklahoma City also joined in congratulating Marshal White.

The scene was a most impressive one, with the lawn being filled with chairs for the ladies and groups of men scattered about with a rim of automobiles in double formation forming a semi-circle. Informality prevailed and the utmost of good fellowship was evident among both Republican and Democratic leaders present.

Several speakers were asked to say a few words about the occasion. Among those who spoke briefly and informally were A.C. Alexander, Republican State Chairman; Roy St. Lewis, assistant United States Attorney for the district; Fred Clark of Oklahoma City; L.W. Leech, Superintendent of the Shawnee Indian Agency; Mayor Charlie C. Hawk, W.L. Chapman, and Frank S. Roodhouse of Shawnee.

FIRE TAKES BIG TOLL AT INDIAN SANATORIUM DURING HIGH WINDS

Loss at the United States Indian Sanatorium near the city from a fire late on July 13, 1925, was estimated at $20,000. Three large barns, 100 tons of hay, some implements, and a large quantity of feed was destroyed by the flames.

For a time, it appeared that one of the barns would be saved, but a switch in the wind placed it in the path of the flames. The Shawnee Fire Department answered the alarm and aided in saving other buildings.

When the firemen arrived at the scene, three of the school buildings, in addition to the barns, were in flames. Firemen, assisted by volunteers, mounted the buildings and started tearing away the burning shingles. Allan “Dick” Richards and A.B. Fell, who were assisting in the work, climbed on one of the buildings and just as they gained the top, their ladder fell.

Jack Brill brought the hose inside the building in time to save the structure. The roof was extremely steep. Richards lost his footing and started falling head downward. Just before he reached the edge of the building, he changed ends and fell safely on his feet. Fell managed to hold on until a ladder saved him, but after he had been rescued, it was found that two fingers were broken. This happened when he used them in prying loose the burning woodwork.

Assistant Chief Fred Hankins, who was away from the station when the alarm sounded, reached the fire in time to direct activities although his roadster stuck in the mud beside the new concrete road. Hankins made his way to the fire on foot.

Workers from the Santa Fe shops hastened to the scene of the fire and rendered assistance. Fell stated that had not workers from the Rock Island and Shawnee Fire Departments reached the Sanatorium when they did, the loss would probably have been about $50,000, as most of those about the mission were engaged in fighting the fire of the barns and were unable to protect the other buildings.

A high wind, blowing almost a gale, made fire-fighting difficult, along with a constant menace of all buildings.

 (These stories and hundreds more appear in the first volume of Shawnee history, entitled: “REDBUD CITY: SHAWNEE, THE EARLY YEARS, 1830-1929.” It can be purchased by calling Clyde Wooldridge at (918) 470-3728, or by visiting the Pottawatomie County Historical Society at the old Santa Fe Depot. The cost of purchase is $35. Volume two, “1930-1949,” is also available for $30. Volume three, “REDBUD CITY: SHAWNEE, THE MIDDLE YEARS, 1950-1969,” is now available, at a cost of $35. All three volumes are more than 400 pages with hundreds of photos and illustrations. A combination of two or three can be purchased at $30 each. They are fully indexed, making it easy to look up individuals or places of business. Volume four 1970-1989, is scheduled for the fall of 2020; volume five 1990-2009, should be available in the fall of 2021; and volume six 2010-to the present, is scheduled for the fall of 2022. They are also available on thumb drive at the PCHS Museum.)

Clyde Wooldridge is a local historian.