Shawnee City Commissioners unanimously put their stamp of approval on a detachment request Monday. The Kickapoo Tribe made a de-annexation request to build tribal housing under the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Housing Authority.

Shawnee City Commissioners unanimously put their stamp of approval on a detachment request Monday.

The Kickapoo Tribe made a de-annexation request to build tribal housing under the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Housing Authority.

“They have an opportunity to procure a grant to build a tribal subdivision for elders and other tribal members,” Shawnee City Manager Chance Allison said.

The property in question is about 27 acres near State Highway 177 that was annexed into the City of Shawnee in 1980.

Since the subject property is not within the city's traditional limits, Shawnee City Manager Chance Allison said it would cost the city between $3 and $5 million to extend water and sewage infrastructure to the area in order to provide services.

“They have other opportunities to provide water services to their subdivision that would be much more affordable,” he said. “Quite frankly, this is not economically beneficial to the city.”

He said in an opportunity to be a good steward with the tribe and to encourage strategic partnerships, staff recommends to go forth with the de-annexation.

“I'm usually opposed to any kind of de-annexation because what we need to be doing is adding area, not de-annexing, but I think the Kickapoo tribe has proven over the years that they do very well with their housing and patrol it, and we don't have to worry about code enforcement because they do a good job there,” Ward 3 City Commissioner James Harrod said.

Another point to consider is as a sovereign nation the Kickapoo Tribe is tax-exempt; the new housing project would not be subject to local taxation.

“There's no tax benefit for the city,” Allison said.

After the detachment was approved, an emergency clause also was passed unanimously.