The coronavirus has claimed the life of a second person in Pottawatomie County as the state now has 88 deaths.

The Oklahoma State Department of Health, in its Friday report, announced eight additional deaths, with one of the eight recorded as a Pottawatomie County woman older than age 65.

As of Friday, there were 1,794 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state and with 428 hospitalized from this virus.

The Oklahoma State Department of Health reports it is working closely with partners at long term care facilities to ensure proper infection control measures are in place in order to minimize the impact of COVID-19 to residents and staff within the facilities.

And while this is Easter weekend, the OSDH said families are encouraged to celebrate the upcoming religious holidays and spring festivities virtually, avoiding large gatherings, in order to comply with social distancing guidelines and avoid the spread of the virus.

Local cases

Pottawatomie County: 25 cases and two deaths

Lincoln County: 11 cases and no deaths

Seminole County: 6 cases and one death

Oklahoma Test Results

Positive: 1,794

Total Negative Specimens: 20,370

Total number of Specimens to date: 22,246

Total Hospitalizations: 428

On the heels of more than 22,000 specimens tested for COVID-19 in Oklahoma, the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) also released on Friday its modeling to forecast how the COVID-19 pandemic could occur in the state through May 1.

Authored by Aaron M. Wendelboe, PhD; Justin Dvorak, PhD; and Michael P. Anderson, PhD, the COVID-19 modeling identifies the following key metrics for Oklahoma:

Date of peak: April 21

· Number of New Cases at the Peak: 436

· Number of Deaths at the Peak: 22

· Number of New Hospitalizations at the Peak: 131

· Number of People in the Hospital for COVID at the Peak: 915

· Number of People in the ICU for COVID at the Peak: 458

Cumulative Number of COVID-19-positive cases by May 1: 9,300

Cumulative Number of Deaths by May 1: 469 deaths

“Over the past week, Oklahoma has significantly increased COVID-19 testing data due to expanded capacity at labs and more than 80 mobile testing locations across the state,” said Dr. Aaron Wendelboe, interim state epidemiologist. “This new data gave our team of epidemiologists stronger insight to forecast a COVID-19 model for the State of Oklahoma. At this point, we are estimating that Oklahoma will hit peak demand on hospitals, ICU beds, and other critical medical supplies around April 21.”

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.