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Shawnee family experiences unexpected at-home birth

Tina Bridenstine
The Shawnee News-Star
Tristan and Tristy Campbell are pictured with their newborn daughter, Trinitee Jean.

One Shawnee family has an unusual birth story after what was originally deemed Braxton Hicks contractions led to an at-home birth.

Earlier this month, Tristy Campbell was near to her due date and experiencing contractions, so she went to SSM Health St. Anthony Hospital – Shawnee on two consecutive days. Both days, she said, she was told the contractions were Braxton Hicks and that she should wait for her water to break, then sent home.

“They said, 'We've had to send people home crying because they get so bad, so be ready to deal with that,'” Tristy said.

The night of Wednesday, Jan. 13, Tristy's husband Tristan Campbell was working, so she and 3-year-old son Trenton Campbell stayed with her parents in Shawnee so she wouldn't be alone if she went into labor.

After leaving the hospital that day, she said she continued to have contractions throughout the day and into the night.

“I just sat in the front room on the couch and was trying to sleep. I'd have contractions and would wake up and try to breathe through them,” she said.

Finally, in the middle of the night, she said she went to use the bathroom and realized she could feel the baby's head coming out.

“Luckily, I was here with my parents, so I screamed for my mom,” she said.

Tristy's father, Kevin O'Shell, called for an ambulance and tried to get Tristy to walk out to the car to go to the hospital, but she said she realized she couldn't make it.

“Her head popped out and my mom caught her before she hit the ground,” Tristy said.

She described a frightening night for all involved.

When her daughter was born, Tristy was worried because she didn't hear the baby crying, but she said her mother wiped the baby's face off and made sure she was breathing.

“She used to be a nurse, and she'd had kids as well, so she'd seen it all done,” Tristy said, adding that her mother is now listed on the birth certificate as the person who delivered her daughter.

When the ambulance arrived at her parents' house, Tristy said she and the baby were still connected by the umbilical cord, and she'd started to pass out from losing blood. The paramedics cut the cord and took Tristy and newborn baby to the hospital.

Meanwhile, 3-year-old Trenton had been sleeping with Tristy and heard her screams as contractions grew worse.

“He was right beside me the whole time, crying and screaming. He knew something was going on, but he didn't understand,” she said, though she said her parents were able to reassure him and calm him down after she was taken to the hospital.

She said it was also a surprise for her husband, who was still at work while all of this happened.

“It was so weird because he didn't get to cut the cord this time,” Tristy said. “My mom called and told him he needed to get to the hospital. His eyes were so wide. He was in shock too.”

All turned out well, however, and Tristy said they looked her newborn daughter over at the hospital and found her to be healthy.

Trinitee Jean Campbell was born at 3:33 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 14, at the home of her grandparents in Shawnee.

The new little girl, born at 3:33 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 14, was named Trinitee Jean. She weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces.

“It was definitely a crazy, unexpected experience,” Tristy said. “I was ready to get my epidural. I always said 'There's no way I can deal with natural childbirth. That's too painful.' And then I ended up having her at home.”

Tina Bridenstine reports on community events and things to do around Shawnee, as well as entertainment and church news, for The Shawnee News-Star. Tina has been a journalist on the News-Star staff since 2009 and can be reached at tina.bridenstine@news-star.com.

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